DENVER, CO - MARCH 23: People stand in freshly painted circles, six-feet-apart, as they wait in a two-hour line to buy marijuana products from Good Chemistry on March 23, 2020 in Denver, Colorado. Residents stock up on essentials before stores close for three weeks amid a shelter-in-place order starting Tuesday evening due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock announced liquor stores and marijuana dispensaries would be allowed to stay open as long as they enforced extreme social distancing practices. (Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images)

#Anthropology roundup: “Why Social Distancing Feels So Strange… “Coronavirus Rituals…

DENVER, CO – MARCH 23: People stand in freshly painted circles, six-feet-apart, as they wait in a two-hour line to buy marijuana products from Good Chemistry on March 23, 2020 in Denver, Colorado. Residents stock up on essentials before stores close for three weeks amid a shelter-in-place order starting Tuesday evening due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock announced liquor stores and marijuana dispensaries would be allowed to stay open as long as they enforced extreme social distancing practices. (Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images)
Why Social Distancing Feels So Strange

Explaining the Emergence of Coronavirus Rituals

People in Rome, Italy, go out on their balconies at a specific time to give one another a round of applause during the coronavirus lockdown. Alessandra Tarantino/AP Photo

This article was originally published at The Conversation and has been republished under Creative Commons.

Responding to the coronavirus pandemic, most American universities have suspended all campus activities. Like millions of people all around the world, the lives of students all over the U.S. has changed overnight.


Why Some States Are Resisting Social Distancing Measures

Governors of a half-dozen states worry about the economic fallout of forcing businesses to close and say there’s no clear guidance from Washington.

A Scientist Just Proved One of Darwin’s Evolution Theories, 161 Years Later

A Scientist Just Proved One of Darwin’s Evolution Theories, 161 Years Later  Popular Mechanics


Keig, Aberdeenshire. A gaggle of excited children are instructing community archaeologist Colin Shepherd when to drop a china mug on the floor so that they can see how it breaks on impact. They will use the results of this experiment to better understand an archaeological find: the broken pieces of an old marmalade jar, last used for breakfast around 100 years ago.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: