On the use of videos in Digital Diplomacy

Images & Diplomacy

Images have traditionally played an important role in diplomacy. For instance, paintings were often used to bare testimony to diplomatic summits and conferences. Such is the case with Gerard ter Borch’s painting of the treaty of Munster. Additionally, political cartoons were used to narrate a nation’s foreign policy, frame its adversaries, manage public expectations and raise support for government policy.  Such is the case with the cartoon below depicting the British monarch and Napoleon.  Finally, images could, at times, lead to diplomatic crises. Such was the case when Hans Holbein chose to depict Anne of Cleves as a rare beauty. The disappointment of Henry the 8th with the actual Anne led to their divorce and the collapse of a union between England and Protestant German states.

How Twitter’s Feed Algorithm Works – As Explained by Twitter

Twitter provides an overview of the key elements of their feed algorithm and how it decides which tweets to show you.

Digital Hegemonies: The Localness of Search Engine Results

  I have a new paper out in the Annals of the American Association of Geographers with Andrea Ballatore and Shilad Sen. In it, we ask (and empirically answer) questions about the the local-ness versus foreign-ness of content that Google serves up to people around the world. You can access the full paper below.

ISIS created its own social network to spread propaganda

Social media has been a main tool for Islamic State militants to spread propaganda and recruit members for years now. But as companies like Twitter and Telegram continue to crack down on ISIS accounts, militants appear to be building their own privat…
Imagine life without Wikipedia. While for much of the West the idea seems preposterous, thanks to strict online censorship this Wiki-less-world is very much a reality in China. Now, in a bid to catch up, the Chinese government is looking to create it…

About.com was one of the biggest and oldest web sites on the internet. Then it died. Why?

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