#Anthropology roundup: “Six Reasons to Save Archaeology From Funding Cuts… “Heidi Larson, Vaccine Anthropologist

A composite photograph of the top, side, and bottom of an oval medal seal. The bottom has an inscription around the edge and leaves and a flower in the center.

 

Archaeology offers a detailed look at humanity’s past and important insights into the present and future. Jo Ahmet/Kent County Council

This article was originally published at The Conversation and has been republished under Creative Commons.

Archaeology is in trouble. The U.K. government recently announced plans to cut its subsidy for English university teaching of the subject (along with many arts courses) by 50 percent because it is not part of the government’s “strategic priorities.”

Heidi Larson, Vaccine Anthropologist

Heidi Larson, Vaccine Anthropologist  The New Yorker

How Early Humans Shaped the World With Fire

 

Ancient humans used fire for warmth and food preparation, but also as a tool to shape the physical environment. Jessica Thompson

This article was originally published at The Conversation and has been republished under Creative Commons.

Fields of rust-colored soil, spindly cassava, small farms, and villages dot the landscape. Dust and smoke blur the mountains visible beyond massive Lake Malawi. Here, in tropical Africa, you can’t escape the signs of human presence.

Two young people sit facing each other with paper on their laps. Behind them are large photos and a large grey storyboard.

 

Participants of FunKino, a collaborative filmmaking laboratory in Italy, discuss ideas for storyboarding in 2019. FunKino—Cinema for Inclusion project promoted by Zabbara

In the first scene of the short coming-of-age film Jabal-la montagna, viewers see a young woman venturing out alone onto a desolate street in Palermo, Italy. The film traces the story of Giusy, who leaves her group home after feeling misunderstood by those around her. When she witnesses the mugging of an older man, Giusy feels compelled to intervene. After she successfully recovers the wallet, she runs after the man as he’s getting on a bus and returns it to him. The rest of the film focuses on Giusy as she befriends this man—who turns out to be a poet—and follows him to the outskirts of the city.

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