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Making sense of Erzurum

At noon we arrived Erzurum. Artvin was an inviting blend of secularism and religiosity. I did hang out with local boys, we went to Kafkasör Yaylası, had a BBQ, drank some. Some were fasting some were not. We did break iftar together. I was told Artvin was called “little Moscow” in the old times, as many leftist leaders grew up in that town.

http://turkeywallpapers.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/erzurum.jpg?resize=555%2C417
a view of Erzurum

Erzurum is huge, the biggest town in Eastern Anatolia but unfortunately a relatively socially intolerant place. Still, I was always curious of this town and I am glad I can finally make it.

https://i0.wp.com/www.thewallpapers.us/data/media/202/erzurum.jpg?w=640

I am dreaming of cağ kebabı. I will have it in the evening.

Some addresses:

Artvin Öğretmenevi

Erzurum Öğretmenevi

https://i1.wp.com/www.bayaneli.com/yonet/up/erzurum-cag-kebabi_y35.jpg?resize=500%2C374
Cağ Kebap via http://www.bayaneli.com

Koç Cağ Kebap

p.s. next day, I visited the campus of Atatürk University. It has the biggest campus in Eastern Anatolia. I wondered around the city. I was more relaxed by then…

I saw Çifte Minareli Medrese and  the city citadel- or what is left of it…

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