Share this post with Digg

The top 100 stories that changed the world

BBC Culture recently polled authors, journalists, and other literary types from 35 different countries and asked them “to nominate up to five fictional stories they felt had shaped mindsets or influenced history”. From the responses, they compiled a list of 100 stories that shaped the world. Here’s the top 5:

5. Things Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe, 1958)
4. Nineteen Eighty-Four (George Orwell, 1949)
3. Frankenstein (Mary Shelley, 1818)
2. Uncle Tom’s Cabin (Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1852)
1. The Odyssey (Homer, 8th Century BC)

Arkady Babchenko in Tskhinvali, Georgia, in 2008. Photo by anonymous via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0.

‘Newsrooms around the world are aiming for more interactivity and better user journey through data stories’

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Collaboration and insights: Here’s what you missed at two useful journalism conferences last week

Two powerhouse gatherings in the journalism world happened at the end of last week, digging into topics from collaborative journalism to reader revenue.

The ONA Insights event in Toronto featured keynotes on Vox Media’s editorial voice and blockchain in journalism with dives into newsletters, analytics, growth in international audience, and more. Over in New Jersey, the Center for Cooperative Media’s collaborators met to brainstorm about working together in journalism at the Collaborative Journalism Summit.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: