6 Tales of Censorship in the Golden Age of Free Speech

Blocked by Trump, fired by Google, suspended by Facebook. The social internet gives everyone a voice, it also has countless ways of punishing us for speaking.
Special Issue: How technology is upending everything we thought we knew about public discourse.

Change My View: Why Our Best Hope for Civil Discourse Is on Reddit

What’s astounding about Kal Turnbull’s brainchild is that no single radioactive topic—not Trump, Brexit, sex, guns—has overrun the subreddit.

Most popular GIFs used to express emotion in different countries

People often use animated GIFs to digitally express caricatures of emotion or reaction. So when you look at the most distinct ones of various countries associated with specific emotions, you get sort of a caricature for each region. Amanda Hess and Quoctrung Bui for The Upshot looked.

Libertarian wisdom holds that “the answer to bad speech is more speech,” but if you’re a Peter Thiel libertarian (that is, the kind of “freedom lover” who doesn’t think women should vote, wants to spy on everyone in the world, and secretly wields power to censor the free press), then “the answer to bad speech is secretly backing lawsuits by washed-up pro-wrestlers in order to kill a media outlet whose reporting you don’t like.”

Facebook is making big, immediate changes to News Feed. The company will now prioritize content from friends, family, and groups over “public content like posts from businesses, brands, and media,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a post Thursday night. News publishers that have relied on Facebook for traffic will suffer: “Some news helps start conversations on important issues,” Zuckerberg wrote. “But too often today, watching video, reading news or getting a page update is just a passive experience.”

Party described in Vanity Fair article and forthcoming book was at a home of Steve Jurvetson, a founding partner of venture-capital firm DFJ who left the firm in November.

Ten years ago, November 2007 to be precise, we published an articlefeaturing the four leading torrent site admins at the time.

Niek van der Maas of Mininova, Justin Bunnell of TorrentSpy, Pirate Bay’s Peter Sunde and isoHunt’s Gary Fung were all kind enough to share their vision of BitTorrent’s future.

This future is the present today, and although the predictions were not all spot-on, there are a few interesting observations to make.

For one, these four men were all known by name, despite the uncertain legal situation they were in. How different is that today, when the operators of most of the world’s largest torrent sites are unknown to the broader public.

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