On October 1, a referendum will be held on whether Catalonia, an autonomous region of the northeast of Spain, should declare itself to be an independent country.  The Spanish government has ruled the referendum illegal, and is taking action on a number of fronts to shut it down and to censor communications promoting it. One of its latest moves in this campaign was a Tuesday police raid of the offices of puntCAT, the domain registry that operates the .cat top-level domain, resulting in the seizure of computers, the arrest of its head of IT for sedition, and the deletion of domains promoting the October 1 referendum, such as refoct1.cat (that website is now available at an alternate URL).

Why some Catalans want independence… and some don’t

Four people in Catalonia‘s capital city, Barcelona, tell us what it means to be Catalan – and why some people there want independence from Spain.
Spain’s right-wing government orders brutal police crackdown on Catalan independence referendum

The 2015 Catalan elections were widely viewed as a proxy referendum on independence from Spain and the brutal austerity imposed by Madrid, whose courts declared independence referendums to be illegal , augmenting its legal

Catalonia referendum: Police block store for ballot boxes

Barcelona police block access to ballot boxes as students urge Catalonia to vote for independence.

Catalonia referendum: Protests over raids to halt vote

Spain’s government has stepped up efforts to halt an independence vote in Catalonia they call illegal.

Hungary set for another ‘national consultation’ targeting Soros

Hungary is set to launch another “national consultation” about US financier and philanthropist George Soros, the government said on Tuesday (19 September), paving the way for fresh attacks on the man portrayed as the public enemy before next year’s elections.

Spanish police confiscate Catalan referendum material

Officials crack down on Catalan referendum push, with ‘largest intervention’ so far seizing 1.3m posters and pamphlets.
Madrid gives Catalonia 48 hours to give up its plans for a referendum or lose control of its budget.
Hundreds of mayors face legal action for backing the “illegal” referendum on independence from Spain.

German elections 2017: 8 proposals for Germany’s progressives

Germany needs new narratives and policy agendas in order to energise a new politics across Europe – a politics which will reflect the common interest of the majority of Europeans.

German elections 2017 – ballot paper. Angela Merkel (CDU) has represented Stralsund in the German parliament since 1990. Stefan Sauer/Press Association. All rights reserved.Germany is pivotal. It is, and ought to be, a country central to the European project. But this project is in trouble because of a political failure to align the interests of most Germans with those of most other Europeans. Thus, Germany needs new narratives and policy agendas in order to energise a new politics across Europe – a politics which will reflect the common interest of the majority of Europeans. But who will spread these new narratives and policy agendas? So far, the campaign for the upcoming German elections has not been encouraging in that regard. Ahead of the 2017 German federal elections next September 24, DiEM25 acknowledges the issues at stake and has taken action. Here’s how:

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