Turkey’s Erdogan Refuses to Back Down in Feud With Germany

“You do not have the power to scare us,” the president said in response to German criticisms.
Reaction follows German threat to slap sanctions and decision to issue travel advisory amid row over activists’ arrest.
Germany’s tough stance on fraying relations with Turkey is “understandable,” not least given Ankara’s detention of human rights activists including German nationals, EU Commissioner for Enlargement Johannes Hahn said in an interview published July 22

Germany freezes arms shipments to Turkey: Report

Germany has frozen all arms deliveries to Turkey, a newspaper reported on July 21, amid a row between the NATO partners that has sharply worsened since the arrest of several rights activists in Istanbul.

Turkey’s Arrest of German Activist Heightens Nations’ Tensions

Germany urged its citizens to exercise caution when traveling in Turkey and warned that it might cut off export insurance guarantees and other economic aid.

In State of Emergency, Turkey Jails Six Human Rights Defenders Pending Trial

Demonstrators on World Press Freedom Day in Turkey 2013. Image by Amnesty International Turkey.

Germany warns citizens of Turkey risks amid arrests

German citizens and firms are advised that they face risks in Turkey following “arbitrary” arrests.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel on July 18 sharply criticized arrest of German human rights activist Peter Steudtner in Turkey as “absolutely unjustified”

Debate: How the failed coup has changed Turkey

Turkey has marked the one-year anniversary of the failed coup of 15 July 2016 with mass rallies. Tens of thousands gathered to hear a speech by President Erdoğan in which he once again advocated the reintroduction of the death penalty. What do Europe’s commentators think about the ways in which Turkey has changed since last summer?

Turkey holds six rights activists on charges of aiding terror group

Amnesty International urges Theresa May to speak out about Turkey’s slide into authoritarian rule over case described as ‘travesty of justice’

Amnesty International urged the British government to end its silence over Turkey’s slide into authoritarian rule on Tuesday after its local director and five other activists were remanded in custody on accusations of belonging to a terrorist organisation. It is possible the six will now be held in jail for as long as two years before their full trial comes to court.

Germany cannot continue as it had been in relations with Turkey, German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel said on July 20, pointing to the need for a new direction in Turkish policy.

Any lingering hopes that Erdoğan would return to the path of democracy have wilted. Instead he has solidified his power to push his political agenda

• Ersin Şenel is an economist and a political scientist based in Istanbul, TurkeyA year after Turkey’s failed coup attempt, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s regime faces a dilemma: first it fears any kind of street-based movement. Erdoğan’s harsh response to the Gezi Park protests in 2013 or the protests that were brutally quashed in the Kurdish cities of south-east Turkey last year are examples. Yet with the president’s power built on a friend-or-foe dichotomy, he also needs a street-based legitimacy. Witness the weekend ceremonies marking the anniversary of 15 July in which he whipped up public support for punishing coup plotters with the death penalty and talked about “ripping the heads” off so-called traitors.

Turkey’s Foreign Ministry stated on July 20 that there had been a serious confidence crisis between Berlin and Ankara

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