In the new era of “alternative facts,” journalists will need all the help they can get in covering the Trump administration and administering the correct Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to hold the administration accountable.

The future of journalism under President Trump

Will the White House press corps fall in line or fight back with adversarial journalism? Plus, Obama’s media legacy.

When Spotlight won the Oscar for best picture in 2016, it had already sparked a degree of journalistic nostalgia, harkening back to an era before Twitter determined the media cycle (and did so at a breakneck pace). Yes, there was once a time when investigative teams were given the resources, time and space to shake the foundations of the world’s most powerful institutions.

 

A family’s garage vandalized with an image of a swastika and a hateful message targeted at Arabs. Jewish community centers receiving bomb threats. These are just a slice of the incidents of hate across the country after the election of Donald Trump — but getting reliable data on the prevalence of hate and bias crimes to answer questions about whether these sorts of crimes are truly on the rise is nearly impossible.

 

Frontline has worked to provide primary source materials around its films for years, but that’s mostly taken the form of additional documents and extended interviews on its website. But with its latest film, “Trump’s Road to the White House,” first aired Tuesday evening, Frontline is trying something new: an interactive, annotated script that audiences can use to navigate the film, and new software that lets users highlight portions of the film and share them on social media or via email.

 

“Nearly a dozen” White House staffers have told Washington Post reporters that Trump was “demoralized” by press reports that showed a poor turnout for his inauguration and a much larger turnout for the Women’s March the next day, and overruled his advisors and aides’ advice to let it go — instead, he ordered press secretary Sean Spicer to tell a series of easily falsifiable lies to the media that misrepresented the turnout for the inauguration.

Television, not the web, was the main news source for both Trump and Clinton voters, says Pew

 

Liberals and conservatives often get their news from different sources. A new study from Pew shows that, during the 2016 presidential election, Clinton voters and Trump voters also differed in another big way: the number of sources they relied on.

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