President Obama just effectively freed Chelsea Manning from the 32 remaining years in her jail sentence, according to the New York Times. While it’s not a presidential pardon, the commutation of Manning’s sentence will see her go free in just five months.
Chelsea Manning to go free!

 

President Obama commuted whistleblower Chelsea Manning’s remaining prison sentence. She will go free on May 17 of this year as opposed to 2045, the duration of her full sentence. From the New York Times:

Chelsea Manning isn’t the only source of online leaks to get a new lease on life. President Obama has pardoned General James Cartwright, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI when it investigated leaks that revealed details of Stuxnet, the US-backed…
 
If you thought Obama might give Edward Snowden a similar reprieve to Chelsea Manning this week, think again. While the formed NSA-contractor turned whistleblower has explained why the president should grant him clemency, he hasn’t done anything beyon…

ISIS is now weaponizing consumer drones with bombs

 

With its hold over territories in Syria and the Northern Iraqi city of Mosul slipping steadily, terrorist group ISIS is finding itself forced to improvise in its battle against Iraqi Security Forces (ISF).

Spending on Social Advertising Is on the Rise (Report)

 

Growth across social networks was a defining feature throughout 2016. While the increase in mobile and media consumption made headlines, the underlying growth–spending on social advertising–will yield more change. A fourth-quarter report from data science and media technology provider 4C Insights examines the evolution in social advertising spending.

 

I had an unsettling realization and <href=”https://www.google.com/trends/explore?date=2009-12-13%202017-01-13&geo=US&q=pupper,kitteh”>it checked out. Is it just that we needed their warm, comforting companionship instead of the cooly cerebral presence of felines? Or are they in on it?

History of data visualization

 

I have an affinity for new things designed as old things, so this brief history of data visualization by RJ Andrews hits the spot.

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