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Scotland could lose between 30,000 to 80,000 jobs as a result of Brexit, according to the Fraser of Allander Institute.
Why Poland’s ‘Black Protest’ could be a potential game changer

With its move to change the abortion legislation, the Polish government has opened Pandora’s box, the consequences of which it cannot possibly control.

Polish women protest against a legislative proposal for a total ban on abortion in Poland. PAimages/Geert Vanden Wijngaert. All rights reserved.It was Czarny Poniedziałek – Black Monday. On Monday 3 October Poland saw a nationwide ‘women’s strike’. Inspired by an Icelandic protest action from back in 1975, tens of thousands of Polish women heeded a call to strike and protest against the proposal of a new abortion law supported by the current PiS (Prawo i Sprawiedliwość – Law and Justice) government.

Poland’s ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party has looked firmly in control since sweeping to power a year ago but it may have pressed its conservative agenda too far by initially backing a virtual ban on abortion.
Poland abortion: Parliament rejects near-total ban

Poland’s parliament rejects a citizens’ bill for a near-total ban on abortion, after the government was swayed by nationwide protests on Monday.
The pound suffered a “flash crash” Friday morning, its biggest drop since Britain voted in June to leave the EU, with confused traders scrambling to understand the reason for the sharp sell-off.
Norway is erecting a controversial steel fence along its border post with Russia following a surge in migrant arrivals last year.
After weeks of indecision the parliament in Tallinn has elected a woman to the office of president – a first in the country’s history. Biologist Kersti Kaljulaid, 46, hitherto employed at the European Court of Auditors, will become Estonia’s new head of state. Commentators in the country have high hopes for the successor to Toomas Hendrik Ilves.
Anti-fascist demonstrators flee as police attack a barricade.

Image: David Savill/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

The former Portuguese prime minister Antonio Guterres is poised to become the next UN secretary general, diplomats say.
The Hungarian referendum on refugee quotas has failed due to the low voter turnout. In a surprise outcome, the Colombians have voted against the peace deal with the Farc rebels. A few months ago the Brexit vote sent shockwaves through Europe. For some commentators the referendum is inappropriate as a democratic instrument. Others warn against demonising referendums as a political institution.
British Prime Minister Theresa May presented a broad outline for the UK’s EU exit negotiations on Sunday. She indicated a move toward a “hard” Brexit that could cost the country its access to the single market. Those who voted for Brexit will be hit the worst, commentators observe, and call for more clarity on the Brexit.
Thousands of people in Poland have protested against a total ban on abortion. Dressed all in black they took to the streets on Monday to demonstrate against the national conservative PiS government’s planned ban. Commentators believe this could be the start of a major wave of protests.

Iceland has already faced steep political turmoil in 2016. Later this month, things could get even more interesting, as the country’s upstart Píratar Party (or Pirate Party) remains in the lead in polls leading up to the nation’s general election at the end of October.

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