Last night state of emergency was declared for three months. Today it is announced that  European Convention on Human Rights are suspended temporarily citing the French case. I do not know how this will change our daily lives. For the moment, for those friends abroad who are anxious about us, we continue our daily lives. I am in my office, trying to work on some papers I am writing and meeting with prospective undergraduate students. This is the time for prospective students. They have to make their choices before 2 August. Yesterday my mother called me, she asked me if I was in trouble: “I know you do not like Gülen but you were invited to his followers’ events for speeches.” I was happy to see mum made a rational description. When I was in college, she would think I would be involved in every single demonstration she saw in the news, and she would make my already sad life sadder. Over years, I had only one belief left: We can only live in peace in a democratic society and my opposition to ruling power is only in relation to defending democratic rights. If there is a witchunt to include us all just because we are in a democratic opposition, then so be it… 

A successful uprising would have plunged the country into prolonged crisis – and provided a boost for Isis. Yet the president seems to be stoking the unrest
The Turkish leader may be a bitter disappointment to Mr. Obama, but he is still better than other options in the chaotic landscape of the Middle East.
Following the National Security Council and Council of Ministers meetings held subsequent to July 15 coup attempt, President Erdoğan has declared that state of emergency will be put in effect for three months.
Turkey will temporarily suspend the implementation of its obligations emanating from the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in line with the declaration of a state of emergency in the country
The measures and bans during the state of emergency are regulated in article 9, 10, and 11 of the State of Emergency Act.
Following the statement of President Erdoğan declaring state of emergency decision, the decision has been published on the Official Gazette.
Austria has summoned Turkey’s ambassador to Vienna to explain Ankara’s links to demonstrations in Austria in support of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who is leading a crackdown after a failed coup attempt, Austrian Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz said on July 21
Evaluating the case for the extradition of U.S.–based cleric Fethullah Gülen, who has been accused of staging the failed coup attempt in Turkey on July 15, is a “very high priority” for Washington, U.S. Ambassador to Turkey John Bass has said
The stars of football have decided to leave Turkey, with Beşiktaş’s German striker Mario Gomez and Fenerbahçe’s Dutch forward Robin van Persie announcing that they will leave the country

‘We feared the worst’: Turkey’s failed coup a relief for Syrian refugees

Syrians in Turkey are denied full rights but Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s government has offered a basic level of sanctuary

 

The Ministry of National Education has started the process of closing down 626 educational institutions, 524 of which are private and 102 are other institutions subsequent to the July 15 coup attempt.
Three coup plotting soldiers have been arrested for rolling over and killing five people while operating a tank in Istanbul’s Esenler district during the July 15 failed coup attempt

Meet the women in the spotlight during resistance to Turkey’s failed coup

Journalists, police officers, witnesses: Turkey’s women narrate their role in Turkey’s failed coup attempt

‘We see him as one of us’: why many Turks still back authoritarian Erdoğan

President is perceived to represent lower-class and religiously conservative sections of society, and under his rule people have become better off

For the thousands of Turks who gathered outside Istanbul’s city hall on Tuesday evening, one man loomed large. At the end of the street, a giant image of Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Turkey’s president, stared down on the crowds.

Turkey’s long road to EU membership just got longer

President Erdoğan is now more concerned about seizing extra powers to deal with internal opposition than in cosying up to Brussels

Tanks on the street, parliament under attack and fighter jets buzzing over the Bosphorus: Turkey’s failed military coup, which led to the deaths of at least 232 people, has underlined the fragility of democracy in a country that thought it had left military adventurism in the past.

Turkey Pursues Cleric Living in U.S., Blamed as Coup Mastermind

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says Fethullah Gulen was behind a coup attempt last week that almost succeeded in taking over the state and killing Mr. Erdogan himself.

The secret-spilling group’s latest publication claims to shed light on the circumstances of Turkey’s recent armed uprising and the crackdown that’s followed.

Turkey Will Ask U.S. to Extradite Cleric

A spokesman for President Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey said the country is preparing an extradition request for Fethullah Gulen, a U.S.-based cleric, as a suspect in a coup attempt.

Conspiracy, paranoia, and real plots: the bizarre history of Turkey’s military coups
Vox
The exemplar was the 2008 Ergenekon accusations, where hundreds of defendants — a mixture of military officials and civil leaders — were blamed for a secret plot to overthrow the government. That plot possibly existed, in some form or another, but it
Bad news for Turkey’s democracyTribune-Review
Turkey’s ‘Arab Spring’ moment: No Sisi and no more GulenMehr News Agency – English Version
Turkey’s Faltering DemocracyCommon Dreams (press release)
Financial Times –BBC News –Middle East Eye
all 8,975 news articles »

The Defense Ministry announced on July 20 that an investigation had been opened into all military judges and prosecutors, as a part of the ongoing probe into the failed coup attempt of July 15
TİB has blocked access to Wikileaks, which has released 294,548 AKP e-mails.

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