LONDON — In the wake of last Friday’s Paris attacks, a French cartoonist has been sketching scenes that celebrate life in France’s capital city.

Resettling Syrian Refugees: An Alternative

In the wake of the Paris attacks, a number of people, in France and elsewhere, are rethinking their stance on the resettlement of Syrian refugees. But the truth is that the attacks should change nothing. The large-scale resettlement of Syrian refugees in Europe was a bad idea before the Paris attacks, and it is a bad idea now. First, let’s acknowledge that while there may well be a handful of ISIS infiltrators among the Syrian refugees seeking asylum in Europe, the vast majority of them are fleeing Islamist violence, and they have no intention of waging wars on their hosts and benefactors. To suggest otherwise is nonsense. The Islamic State has made no secret of its contempt for those Syrians and Iraqis who’ve fled its rule, and the Paris attacks haven’t changed that. The reason large-scale resettlement in Europe is a mistake is not that Syrian refugees are dangerous. Rather, it is a mistake because large-scale resettlement will require an equally large-scale commitment of resources that European governments, and European voters, are unwilling to make.

Paris attackers ‘psychopathic monsters’

US Secretary of State John Kerry describes Islamic State as “psychopathic monsters” ahead of talks with President Hollande in the wake of the Paris attacks.
ISIS wants to destroy the ‘grey zone’. Here’s how we defend it

After the Paris attacks, it is imperative that we safeguard this arena of co-existence, where people of all faith and none remain unified on the principles of common humanity.

Credit: Mauro Biani ( Manifesto. All rights reserved.


In war

In this nomadic, undefined, polymorphous, and unsymmetrical war, the populations on ‘both shores‘ of the Mediterranean are taken hostage. And Europe has a nearly irreplaceable function.

Minute of silence in Lille.


Paris attacks: Search goes on for missing

Search for Paris missing goes on
VIDEO: Social media responds to Paris attacks

Tributes continue to dominate social media feeds, as the world tries to make sense of the Paris attacks online.

What do the Paris attacks mean for the migration crisis?

Bataclan: ‘No words to express sorrow’

The owners of the Bataclan concert hall in Paris say they have “no words” to express their sorrow following Friday’s attacks.
Was Paris a Tactical Mistake?

Listen to Episode 379 of Slate’s The Gist:

Several politicians call for borders to be sealed in wake of Paris assaults amid growing fears for refugees’ plight.

The trouble with home-grown jihadists

Will France now treat Frenchmen ready to blow themselves up as traitors, or continue seeing them as lost children?

Analysis: The dilemma for France

Response at home and abroad must balance need to protect society from further attacks with an awareness of overreaction.

Paris: a tale of two hashtags

For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. In times of crisis, Newton’s third law of physics offers up a surprisingly robust framework to explore how the world reacts. After the explosions and multiple shootings that rocked the French capital on Friday night, heads of state and politicians poured out their sympathy for the victims on Twitter. “This is an attack on all of humanity and the universal values that we share.” —@POTUS on the attacks in Paris — The White House (@WhiteHouse) November 13, 2015 The reports from Paris are harrowing. Praying for the city and…

VIDEO: Minute’s silence marks Paris attacks

A minute of silence has been held across Europe to commemorate the victims of Friday’s attacks.

France is now under its emergency disaster plan—called the red plan or plan rouge—after attacks in Paris have left more than 100 people dead.


As many as 153 people were killed in a series of terror attacks across Paris Friday night, with Middle-East terror group ISIS claiming responsibility in the aftermath. Authorities described the carnage as the worst acts of violence to hit France since World War II.

Following the Paris Attacks From Benjamin Cazenoves’ Facebook Feed

Social media trawling in the aftermath of tragedy is pure voyeurism, but it’s because we’re all asking the same question: Are you OK?

Turkish Ambassador to Paris Hakkı Akil has denied claims put forward by CNN International’s Christiane Amanpour that two Turkish passports were found on two of the Paris bombers

AFTER A TWO-DAY BATTLE, Kurdish forces announced today that they had liberated the strategic Iraqi town of Sinjar from the Islamic State. The forces consisted of Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga and militias affiliated with the Syria-basedYPG, as well as the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK).

10 Steps towards tax justice in Europe

It’s been a year since the Luxleaks scandal.

The Eurozone’s Minsky Conundrum

Stubbornly low inflation has the European Central Bank worried. But its response – buying even more bonds and lowering its benchmark interest rate even further into negative territory – could backfire, exacerbating existing imbalances and generating serious financial instability.

BERLIN—Nobody can deny that she was brave, or that her sentiments were widely admired. When German Chancellor Angela Merkel declared in August that a Europe that failed on the question of Syrian refugees “won’t be the Europe we wished for,” the world applauded. When she announced she would unilaterally suspend the “Dublin rules,” Europe’s dysfunctional asylum system—in effect opening Germany to any Syrians who could get there—grateful refugees in Hungary began chanting her name.

The terrorist attacks in Paris on Friday (13 November) has prompted the temporary suspension of Spain’s election campaign. EurActiv Spain reports.

At their summit today in Malta, the EU and African heads of state and government hope to agree on an action plan for preventing Africans from fleeing to Europe. The EU is once again betraying its basic principles and closing its doors, some commentators criticise. For others, the proposals don’t go far enough to stop the exodus.

Britain’s EU Renegotiation: Reflections on the Letter

Prime Minister David Cameron’s long awaited letter setting out the terms for EU renegotiation has finally arrived. Accompanied by an explanatory speech, the letter outlines four areas for reform (economic governance, competitiveness, sovereignty and immigration). While these choices attract little surprise, it is a milestone nonetheless to have in writing the opening outlines of the UK government’s position on renegotiation.

Chatham House Speech


Don’t write off Cameron’s EU renegotiation yet

Don’t write off Cameron’s EU renegotiation yet

VIDEO: Migrants on the move across Europe

James Reynolds reports from the Serbian-Croatian border where migrants continue to arrive.

Catalonia crisis forces Spain into unknown territory

Catalonia crisis forces Spain into unknown territory

MAIN FOCUS: France reacts to terrorist attacks | 16/11/2015

The investigations are in full swing following the terrorist attacks in Paris on Friday. France’s air force has launched large-scale attacks on Islamic State targets in Syria, where according to government sources the attacks were planned. Increased surveillance and far more resolute military intervention are called for, some commentators write. Others doubt that radical Islamist ideology can be defeated by a war.

VIDEO: Paris attacks: The Belgian connection

Alex Forsyth reports on the links between Friday’s attacks in Paris and France’s northern neighbour, Belgium.
The European Union will host Turkish President Erdoğan in a summit to discuss ways of stopping migrant flows to the bloc, with the union offering 3 billion euros to help Ankara host more than 2 million Syrian migrants in its country

Europe jihadists ‘recruiting for Iraq’

The 13 suspected members of a jihadist group arrested in raids across Europe were allegedly recruiting foreign fighters to be sent to Syria and Iraq.

Portugal: The saga is far from over

Portugal: The saga is far from over

The Portuguese parliament voted down the government programme submitted by Prime Minister-designate Pedro Passos Coelho, forcing his centre-right minority government to resign. Open Europe’s Vincenzo Scarpetta looks at what may happen next.

Jérôme Chaplier is Coordinator of the European Coalition for Corporate Justice.

Greece’s trade unions brought the country to a virtual standstill on Thursday with anti-austerity protests. The government is once again at loggerheads with the troika over the implementation of the reforms that are a prerequisite for financial aid. But arguing with the creditors won’t help the country out of its predicament, some commentators criticise, urging Athens to take swift action.

Europe crackdown on ‘jihadist network’

Police target 17 people in raids in several European countries on suspicion of links to a “jihadist network”.

‘Human smuggling link’ in copter crash

A Ukrainian helicopter crashes in Slovakia, killing six people, local officials say, amid reports it may have been involved in human smuggling.

Trade talks: Germany urges openness

Germany urges the US to give German MPs access to key documents in the controversial EU-US trade talks known as TTIP.

Migrant crisis: No EU-Africa grand bargain

Africa unimpressed by EU offers over migrants

Regaining control in an unsettled Europe

AMSTERDAM — Objectively speaking, the unprecedented, bloody terrorist attacks in Paris on Friday night were not related to the European refugee crisis that has rumbled on for many months. Certainly the attacks could not have been caused by France’s acceptance of refugees because France, unlike Germany and Sweden, has not been accepting large numbers of refugees. Nor is it credible to believe that recently arrived refugees from the Syrian war were primarily responsible for organizing a complex series of attacks. People who climbed mountains or crossed the Mediterranean on rafts did not arrive in France and transform themselves immediately into armed terrorist killers.Read full article >>
Stark Facebook message to would-be migrants

Since the Danish national election in June, the new government – a minority government consisting of the liberal party Venstre led by Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen – has started to roll back Denmark’s climate change commitment.  The new government’s return to a more critical climate position is likely to have a negative impact on Denmark climate change commitments.

Thousands March Against Gender Violence in Spain


A widely circulated poster for the 7N march.

The terror attacks in Paris on Friday (13 November) could play a role when Danes go the polls on 3 December, to vote on Denmark’s opt-out on Justice and Home Affairs.

Rumanian Punishment Gifts


Rumanian Punishment Gifts by Etelka Penquelik is not a real book, but don’t you wish it were? It’s from designer Sean Tejaratchi’s fantastic LiarTownUSA site.

Brussels will deliver its assessment of the EU members states’ budgets for 2016 on 17 November. France, which has been seen as the eurozone’s number one problem since 2014, now appears to have dropped off the Commission’s radar.

Terrorism will not go away. What are the implications of this sad truth? We face a long ‘simmering war’, akin to the Cold War, requiring strong nerves and smart actions over time.

Syrian and Iraqi refugees in Germany fear that the attacks in Paris could further shift public opinion against the Berlin government’s welcoming asylum policy.

SuspectA French official has identified 27-year-old Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud as the suspected mastermind of Friday’s Paris terror attacks.


A moment of silence echoed across the globe on Monday to pay tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris on Friday.

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