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BDS, the AAA, and Academic Imperialism

We Disagree to Agree

Support for a particular cause can come from numerous sources and points of view, each representing different interests. Similarly, people can arrive at the site of a demonstration, united in protest against an injustice, having arrived there from many different routes (whether the routes are understood in terms of physical transportation, or different social positions, i.e. “walks of life”). One might be in agreement about the basic point made by another speaker, but disagree entirely with that speaker’s reasoning. The wrong path can be taken to the right conclusion, seen from one person’s perspective—or a momentary coincidence of agreement between two otherwise very different perspectives. That would seem to partly describe my reactions to the arguments made by some US anthropologists in favour of the American Anthropological Association showing support for the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, against Israeli occupation of Palestinian territory.

Making Black Lives Matter: Reflections on the Declaration and the Movement (Introduction Part II)

[Savage Minds is pleased to run the second part to the introduction for the “Making Black Lives Matter: Reflections on the Declaration and the Movement” series. Here, Bianca Williams continues with her keynote address from the #WeResist community summit, which took place in Denver in March 2015.]

I paused and looked around the room to see if people were still engaged. I saw my partner-in-resistance Amy E. Brown, a local community organizer nod her head as if to tell me to keep going, and so I pressed forward.

Anthropology and Archaeology Collections Offer Visual, Hands-On Learning
Wesleyan Connection (blog)
At right, Ying Jia Tan, assistant professor of history, taught his class, History of Science and Technology in Modern China, in Wesleyan’s Anthropology and Archaeology Collections. The class’s reading correlated with artifacts displayed in the collections.

Anthropologist Terence Turner dies at 79
Cornell Chronicle
Visiting Professor of AnthropologyTerence Sheldon Turner, emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago, died Nov. 7 at Cayuga Medical Center of a brain hemorrhage. He was 79. “Terry was a truly eminent anthropologist and one of the

Where to Eat and Drink at AAA Denver

If you are interested in tasting some of the culinary delights of Denver while attending the 2015 AAA meetings,  local anthropologist and NAPA AAP Editor John Brett has created a list of his favorite area watering holes and dining establishements. See his blog post at:

Anthropologist Explores Migration Among Canada’s French-Speaking Minorities
Oswego Daily News
OSWEGO — SUNY Oswego anthropology faculty member Lindsay A. Bell has co-authored a book that traces labor mobility among French-speaking Canadians across the broad sweep of the country, from Alberta oil sands and Arctic diamond mines to a .

Ethnographic Poetry and the Leaping Bilingual Mind

[Savage Minds is pleased to run this essay by guest Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor as part of our Writers’ Workshop series. Melisa is Professor of TESOL and World Language Education at the University of Georgia. Winner of the 2015 Beckman Award for “Professors Who Inspire,” she is the author of a forthcoming poetry manuscript “Imperfect Tense,”(Cahnmann-Taylor, In Press), and co-author of two books on bilingual education and artful research: Teachers Act Up! (Cahnmann-Taylor & Souto-Manning, 2010) and Arts-Based Research in Education(Cahnmann-Taylor & Siegesmund, 2008).]

Ethnographies of Language Socialization: Resources for Teaching Undergraduate Anthropology

See below for a list of recent ethnographies on language socialization, which will appeal to educators and students of anthropology, particularly at the undergraduate level, as well as to readers with a general interest in linguistic anthropology.

The Anthropologist- An Interview with Director Seth Kramer

AAA reached out to documentary filmmaker Seth Kramer to discuss his upcoming film The Anthropologist.

At the core of The Anthropologist are the parallel stories of two women: Margaret Mead, who popularized cultural anthropology in America; and Susie Crate, an environmental anthropologist currently studying the impact of climate change. Uniquely revealed from their daughters’ perspectives, Mead and Crate demonstrate a fascination with how societies are forced to negotiate the disruption of their traditional ways of life, whether through encounters with the outside world or the unprecedented change wrought by melting permafrost, receding glaciers and rising tides.

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