On 27 August, a British journalist and a cameraman working for Vice News, a news channel that broadcasts in-depth documentaries about current subjects, and their fixer were detained in Turkey while reporting in Diyarbakir, the main city of the country’s predominantly Kurdish southeastern region. At the beginning of September, the three men were charged by a Turkish judge in Diyarbakir with “deliberately aiding an armed organisation”. The basis for the charge was that the fixer used a complex encryption system on his personal computer that many Islamic State militants allegedly also use for strategic communications.

Across all of its platforms, in both digital and broadcast, the NBCUniversal News Group — NBC News, MSNBC, and CNBC — employs thousands of journalists and publishes hundreds of stories each day.

Facebook isn’t finished with its attempts to move journalists away from their reliance on Twitter. On Thursday, the company launched Signal, a free discovery and curation platform that helps journalists see what’s trending in photos, videos, and (public) posts across Facebook and Instagram.

nytwechatThe New York Times is diving into the world of chat apps with a new bilingual WeChat account. The Times will send out a daily digest of news in English and Chinese targeted at WeChat’s millions of users around the world.

Journalism in the age of Corbyn

Political journalists have failed to predict all of the major events of the last year. They need to start asking themselves serious questions.

Releasing Rasool – Journalism is not a crime

Incarceration of local fixers sends a chilling message: Work with Western reporters and you will be one that pays price.

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