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Twitter must be less cowardly and fight for activists

For years, Twitter has been the go-to communication medium for social and political activists and commentators. Its format is well suited to broadcasting ideas to a large audience in real-time. During the Arab Spring, Twitter proved to be an effective tool for organizing protests across countries like Egypt and Tunisia, in an effort to overthrow unjust governments in the Middle East.

Twitter shuts down transparency tracker

Twitter has stopped a website tracking politicians’ deleted tweets by shutting down its access to the social media giant’s data.


Twitter has killed Politwoops, which monitored politicians’ deleted tweets in 30 countries

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The Open State Foundation (OSF) knew this was coming. The US account was shut down by Twitter in May. Now the hammer has come down on the rest of the group’s Politwoops accounts – each of which was dedicated to monitoring deletions by elected officials in a specific country

trumpPolitiwoops, already dead in the U.S., now dies in 30 more countries. They rely on Twitter’s API, after all, which the company has long made clear is not a public service. The problem: it kills something that keeps politicians honest.

When Twitter shut down the U.S. version of Politwoops, a site that archived American politicians’ deleted tweets, in June, it seemed likely that the 30 other such sites worldwide would eventually get the ax as well. Now that has happened: Over the weekend, the Open State Foundation, which ran the non-U.S. versions of Politwoops and Diplotwoops, reported that Twitter has suspended API access for all of those accounts as well.



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Daniel Rehn/Creative Commons

Daniel Rehn/Creative Commons

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