Cyberculture agenda: “Ashley Madison leak 2.0

Posted by on August 21st, 2015
Stored in Cyberculture

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ashleydump2Self-proclaimed Ashley Madison hackers the Impact Team today released what looks like another 20 gigabytes of ill-gotten data. The just-dropped “other shoe” includes emails from the cheater-dating website’s CEO.

Swarm app
Have you ever been in a relationship with someone who, over time, forgot the little things that mattered? And, when you purposefully address that he or she doesn’t take you out anymore, that person careens, full-blown, so hard into the other direction that it’s almost too obvious how far they want to address their failures?

Google, the world’s most popular Internet search engine, has been given an extra two weeks to counter European Union charges of abusing its market power in a dozen EU countries and stave off a possible billion-euro fine.

VIDEO: No sign of end to Assange stand-off

As Swedish prosecutors drop two sexual assault claims against Julian Assange because of time limits, the BBC’s Ben Bland reports on the background to his legal case.
Assange had been accused of four cases of sexual assault, yet the statute of limitations for three of them is now over.

Britain issues formal protest to Ecuadorian Government over its harboring of Julian Assange

Wikileaks_assange_feat
The British Ambassador in Quito has said there will be a formal protest submitted to the Ecuadorian Government over its decision to harbor WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in its embassy in London. Assange has been holed up in the embassy since 2012, where he has been avoiding extradition to Sweden over sexual assault allegations dating from 2010, fearing he might be extradited to America and have to face trial over WikiLeak’s releasing of confidential documents. The Swedish case has been formally dropped now as it ran out of time to bring the charges forward, but he could still be facing…

Q&A: Why are bloggers being killed in Bangladesh?

Zafar Sobhan, Dhaka Tribune editor, tells Al Jazeera that police negligence played a big role in four murders this year.
More than 100 websites have been denied access for purported links to the outlawed PKK since late July when conflict began once between the army and the PKK throughout the country, leading to numerous deaths on both sides

Assangej

Swedish prosecutors said Thursday they have dropped three cases of sexual misconduct against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange because they have expired, but will continue to investigate accusations of rape against him.

Hillary’s Foray Into Emoji Politics Didn’t Go So Well

Emoji: for when you’re truly at a loss for words.

Gah, Tinder: Never Tweet

Gah, Tinder: Never Tweet

Tinder freaked out on Twitter last night. We asked PR experts about what they could have been thinking.

Earlier this week Tinder, the dating app that is largely known for facilitating casual hook-ups, lost its shit on Twitter over an article in Vanity Fair. And a big part of why you may heard about the Vanity Fair article is for no other reason than because Tinder decided to lose its shit. It’s called the Streisand effect, and it carries with it a big lesson on why sometimes brand management means just shutting the hell up on moving on.

The New Cold War Is Going Digital

Sometimes we forget about the 40-odd–year Cold War between the former Soviet Union and the West.

Assange assault inquiry to be dropped

Swedish prosecutors will drop their probe into sexual assault allegations against the Wikileaks founder on Thursday, the BBC’s Caroline Hawley reports.
pichai-5
The typical life cycle of any breaking news about a public figure goes like this: the internet flips out, discusses it on Twitter or Facebook, the news shoots up to the top of Reddit or Hacker News and a portion of the Web goes on Wikipedia to update the developing story. Such was the case when it was announced that Sundar Pichai would be taking the role of Google CEO. But it wasn’t his job change that got Wikipedians in an editing frenzy – it was his alma mater. As the seventh largest country in the world, India’s got quite the…

What Online Dating Was Like In The 1960s

In our modern age of Tinder, OkCupid and Match.com, we’re used to the idea that algorithms can help us find love. But while the algorithms may have improved as the market for online dating has expanded, the inputs — the questions these computer matchmakers ask dating hopefuls — haven’t changed much since the 1960s, when Compatibility Research Inc. launched the first computerized dating service.

Earlier this week Tinder, the dating app that is largely known for facilitating casual hook-ups, lost its shit on Twitter over an article in Vanity Fair. And a big part of why you may heard about the Vanity Fair article is for no other reason than because Tinder decided to lose its shit. It’s called the Streisand effect, and it carries with it a big lesson on why sometimes brand management means just shutting the hell up on moving on.

How Hillary and the Other Presidential Hopefuls Are Using Snapchat

In the lead up so far to the 2016 election, social media is more influential than ever. In 2012, Mitt Romney barely had an Instagram, and it was only very recently that Obama joined Twitter.

Yesterday, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, Jr. and law enforcement officials from Paris, London, and Madrid published an anti-encryption op-ed in the New York Times—an op-ed that amounts to nothing more than a blatant attempt to use fear mongering to further their anti-privacy, anti-security, and anti-constitutional agenda. They want a backdoor. We want security, privacy, and respect for the Fourth Amendment’s guarantee that we be “secure” in our papers. After all, the Founding Fathers were big users of encryption.

 

Tinder swiping robot picks your dates while you wait

Tndrbt98

So you’re a busy, probably cynical, cold and calculating executive, but you still want to find love? Allow us to introduce you to the TinderBot

DSCF7489 Facebook Marauder's Map Aran Khanna
Harvard student Aran Khanna was denied his chance to intern at Facebook after the company learned that one of his creations exposed a critical flaw in its Messenger service, reports Boston.com.

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