Search for images of a “professor” on Google and this is what you’ll find: a cornucopia of older white men standing authoritatively in front of a chalkboard.

This tired cliché has become the target of #ILookLikeaProfessor


With the possible exception of John Gray’s Straw Dogs, few works of philosophy confront the barrenness of human life in the modern world in bleaker terms thanTheodor Adorno’s Minima Moralia. Taking its title from Aristotle’s Magna Moralia, or “The Great Ethics,” Adorno’s book subverts the classical idea of the good life as a realistic aspiration in a world dominated by totalitarian systems of control and inexorable, grinding logics of production and consumption. “Our perspective of life has passed into an ideology which conceals the fact that there is life no longer,” writes Adorno in his Dedication. The individual has been “reduced and degraded” by capitalism and fascism, flattened to mere appearance in the “sphere of consumption.”

Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network

Giant academic social networks have taken off to a degree that no one expected even a few years ago. A Nature survey explores why.


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