Two journalists at the prominent German news website Netzpolitik are under investigation for treason after publishing details about the planned expansion of the German Secret Service’s Internet surveillance program.

Slack is a strange beast. Simultaneously a virtual meeting room and water cooler, it somehow encourages members of a distributed work force to socialize and get to know each other while also getting work done. It’s almost like a private social media network that also takes the place of email and instant messaging — what Facebook might have hoped its Messenger would do, Slack has accomplished, at least for a certain set of workers.

When you wake up in the morning, what’s the first app you open? Is it a social media app? If so, you’re in good company.

According to the latest quarterly State of Mobile Advertising report from Opera Mediaworks, which bills itself as the “first mobile ad platform built for brands,” the majority of smartphone users in the United States start their day with a social media app and end their day with an app from the entertainment section of the app store.

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The Associated Press and British Movietone are uploading 17,000 hours of archival news footage, some of dating back to the late 19th century. The videos can be found on the AP Archive and British Movietone channels. Some notable videos from the collection follow. Coverage of the Hindenberg disaster:

Like many other news organizations, The New York Times wrote about the recent high-profile resignations at Gawker (here’s the link), and like a few others, it chose not to link to the root of the Gawker upheaval, a story about a male escort’s attempts to blackmail a married media executive after discovering the executive had a famous brother. As the Times’ public editor Margaret Sullivanexplained in her blog post today, reasons for not linking had to do with Gawker pulling the original story as well as a desire to avoid exposing the name of a private individual — even indirectly through a link — whose privacy Times editors felt had been pointlessly violated.

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