Greece to hold referendum on bailout

Greek PM Alexis Tsipras calls a referendum on 5 July on a bailout plan offered by international creditors that he condemns as “unbearable”.
ECB faces monumental decisions on Greece

ECB and Eurozone face monumental decisions on Greec
Why is Greek aid now €15.3bn instead of €7.2bn?

…hasn’t changed. On Friday, there was a bit of buzz that creditors had tabled a new €15.3bn offer to Greece to extend the current bailout through the end of November. But in reality, there was nothing new to it at all. It is essentially all the money left in the bailout, which was presented to Athens in a more fully articulated two-page memo. Brussels Blog got its hand on the memo, and we’ve posted it here (apologies for its slightly rumpled appearance…I put it in the wrong pocket of my briefcase

As Greeks are queuing up the banks and supermarkets, the spirit of national division rises and the Greek drama reaches its final and most painful stage, argues Pavlos Vasilopoulos. The few days that remain will shape the Greek and European future in an extremely poisonous environment.

Referendum and democracy: putting the demos on stage

The referendum takes the lesson of the squares to the heart of politics. The stakes are high: Greek destiny, the future of the European Union and of democracy is on the line.


Finance ministers of the eurozone on Saturday (27 June) rejected to extend the Greek bailout programme, which expires on Tuesday (30 June). They said Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras had reacted “negatively” by calling a referendum on the creditors’ proposal and by recommending a ‘No’ vote.

Greek bailout extension refused

Eurozone finance ministers reject a Greek request to extend a bailout programme beyond 30 June, when a €1.6bn IMF loan repayment is due.

In an opinion piece for Der Tagesspiegel, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras argues that the assumption that Germany is paying for the wages and pensions of the Greek people is “absolutely false”.

A dilemma for Podemos

Bitter-sweet success in Spain’s regional and local election forces Podemos to choose – between joining with other left parties, following the example of Barcelona and Madrid, or going it alone in the autumn legislative election.

Pablo Iglesias with new mayor of Madrid,Ahora Madrid candidate Manuela Carmen.

Pablo Iglesias with new mayor of Madrid,Ahora Madrid candidate Manuela Carmen. Demotix/ Jose Hinojosa. All rights reserved.A reader of the international press could be forgiven for thinking the May 24 local and regional elections in Spain were an outstanding success for Podemos, the new hope of the southern European left.

Denmark’s new prime minister, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, will on Sunday (28 June) announce that he will lead a liberal minority government over the next four years, as government coalition talks with other right-wing parties have collapsed.

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