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Epidemiologist want to forecast disease like meteorologists forecast rain. And the way people browse Wikipedia could be the key, they say.

The HTML5 standard is now officially being recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The HTML5 standard has been around for years and powers many of your favorite sites

Edward Snowden Explains Why He Blew the Whistle on the NSA in Video Interview with Lawrence Lessig

The Future of Anonymity on the Internet Is Facebook Rooms

Danielle Citron looks at Facebook Rooms and sees a nice middle ground in the battle over anonymity on the internet. Released last week, the new Facebook app is a place where you can chat with other like-minded people about most anything, from the World Series to 18th century playwrights, and because you needn’t use your

Visualizing Our Tech Worship With Giant Webs of Circuitry

For Italian artist Leonardo Ulian, this is our universe. At its center: a microchip. Beyond: resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors. Ulian’s “technological mandalas”—webs of circuitry in the form of the Hindu or Buddhist symbolic diagrams of the cosmos—are icons for an electronic age, and he’ll be exhibiting them this fall in Milan. Each mandala, the biggest […]

How 21 big tech companies got their names

The expression ‘what’s in a name’ – or the slightly more poetic ‘a rose by any other name’ – means, essentially, that a name doesn’t matter. It suggests that it’s the attributes of a person or object that will dictate what it truly is and how it is seen by the world. However, in the world of brands and big business, this isn’t necessarily the case. Company names need to encapsulate something personal but trustworthy. Or have to, at least, offer some relative merit over other options. Why is Nike (originally known as Blue Ribbon Sports) called Nike? Because it’s named after.

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