EurActiv.com

The European Union put into effect on Friday (12 September) a new round of sanctions against Russia over its role in Ukraine, including restrictions on financing for some Russian state-owned companies and asset freezes on leading Russian politicians.

 

In our continuing effort to bring increased transparency to the murky issue of sanctions we’ve compiled some initial thoughts on the likely Russian retaliatory response to the EU’s latest sanctions – published in full here and which we already analysed in detail here.

There are a few key measures which Russia is said to be considering:

New European Union sanctions targeting Russia over the crisis in Ukraine went into force on Friday, despite the threat of retaliation from Moscow.
Scotland’s will to power – and why ‘Britishness’ was never enough

If Scotland votes ‘Yes’ next week, recrimination will be surely followed by deep, profound changes to rUK’s political system.

It is 100 years since the Irish Home Rule Bill reached the statute book, only to lie there dead on the mortuary table of British imperial history. The Irish war of independence consigned it to the crematorium. If the SNP sticks to its timetable for separation, Scotland will become an independent nation in March 2016, on the eve of Ireland’s centenary celebrations of the Easter Rising, the bloody rebellion that signalled the start of the end of the Union of Great Britain and Ireland.

Alex Salmond takes Scotland to the brink

Referendum on September 18 could end three centuries of union with England

If European society at large is applying an exclusionary logic to certain groups, it is only encouraging the retention and expansion of a sedentary identity formation in these groups. A rise in reactionary politics should come as no surprise.

The May 2014 European elections yet again raised the issue of migration in the EU, sparking heated political debates. Interestingly, discussions revolved not merely around how migration should be managed, but about the very state and nature of the Union. Migration has become one of the foremost issues, perhaps the central point bar the economy, in the discussion about the viability of the European Union itself.

Scotland either way: challenging ‘patriarchy in a skirt’

Feminist grassroots activism has raised the voices of women during the Scottish referendum campaign, and to some extent forced both campaigns and the media to engage with their demands. The question now is whether this engagement can be harnessed to advance gender equality under either outcome.

Interview: Leanne Wood – Wales and the spreading of the Scottish rebellion

As Scotland takes a stand against the British State, it’s time for the rest of the UK to join in. Is Leanne Wood, leader of Plaid Cymru, the person to lead them?

US President Barack Obama presented his strategy for countering the IS terrorist militia in an address to the nation on Wednesday. Airstrikes also in Syria, support for moderate Syrian rebels and a broad-based anti-terror coalition are meant to stop the Islamists’ advance. Obama has learned the right lessons from previous US interventions, some commentators write in praise. Others complain that this change in strategy comes far too late.

 

Image taken from the “Podemos” party's Facebook account. Image taken from the Podemos party’s Facebook account.

The Juncker Commission: New orientation should have been different

Blogactiv

The day after the official presentation of the new European commission by the President-designate Jean-Claude Juncker, the press remains ambiguous in its analyses. Some have praised the audacity to try a new structure with the designation of the 7 Vice-presidents, while the mergers and splits within some of the portfolios are still quite incomprehensible. Others are falling into the traditional trap of looking which post is attributed to which country, thus indulging the old ways of the previous mandate – within which the Commission was perceived as no more than the Council’s Secretariat. Finally others vehemently question the competence of some of the designated Commissioners. Of course, it is not easy to fulfil the wishes of all – but one can wonder, whose desires this Commission reflects. Even from a distance, it seems to fall short in terms of responding to the citizens’ wish for change – as expressed during the European elections

The new Commission: jobs for unemployed politicians

Blogactiv

The Commission’s drive to reduce unemployment is working!

Five former prime ministers and 19 former ministers have found jobs. They have high-paid employment as Commissioners in Jean-Claude Juncker‘s new Commission, announced on 10 September 2014. It is composed of a record-breaking number of politicians — twenty eight. It is 100 percent, wall-to-wall, card-carrying politicians.

What to expect from the Commission’s new economics team

Blogactiv

Will France’s Moscovici (left) be effectively shackled by

Finland’s Katainen (centre) and Latvia’s Dombrovskis (right)?

The new European Commission (EC) also sees the overhaul of its approach to the Eurozone. While Pierre Moscovici holds the Economic and Financial Affairs post (essentially Olli Rehn’s successor), he will be overseen by the Vice Presidents (VPs) for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness and the Euro and Social Dialogue – Jyrki Katainen and Valdis Dombrovskis respectively.


Scotland’s will to power – and why ‘Britishness’ was never enough

open Democracy News Analysis – by Nick Pearce

If Scotland votes ‘Yes’ next week, recrimination will be surely followed by deep, profound changes to rUK’s political system.

It is 100 years since the Irish Home Rule Bill reached the statute book, only to lie there dead on the mortuary table of British imperial history. The Irish war of independence consigned it to the crematorium. If the SNP sticks to its timetable for separation, Scotland will become an independent nation in March 2016, on the eve of Ireland’s centenary celebrations of the Easter Rising, the bloody rebellion that signalled the start of the end of the Union of Great Britain and Ireland.


MAIN FOCUS: Juncker revamps EU Commission | 11/09/2014

euro|topics

EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker presented his new cabinet – which includes five former prime ministers – on Wednesday in Brussels. The Commission also features seven vice-presidents with special rights. Some commentators praise the selection as a strong counter-pole to the heads of state and government. For others it fails to mark a real fresh start in EU policy.


EU myths, politics and scaremongering on an independent Scotland

open Democracy News Analysis – by Kirsty Hughes

The EU is governed by hard politics, and the easiest thing for everyone if Scotland votes yes will be that she never leaves the EU.


What impact would Scottish independence have on a Brexit referendum?

Ideas on Europe

As we roll into the final week of the Scottish independence referendum campaign, things look to be closer than many (including myself) had anticipated: even if a No vote looks more likely than not, the success of the Yes campaign in mobilising and motivating voters mean that this will be a deeply consequential vote whatever the result.


Europe’s Juncker Revolution

Project Syndicate by Ana Palacio

Everyone is talking about the appointment of the relatively inexperienced Federica Mogherini as EU High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy. But individual commissioners are far less important than the shift in the European Union’s structure and priorities.


Leaders make Scotland ‘No’ vote plea

BBC News | Europe | World Edition

The UK party leaders will be campaigning in Scotland for a referendum “No” vote, as Alex Salmond claims their visit would boost the “Yes” side.


Italy ‘set for zero growth’ in 2014

BBC News | Europe |
Italy’s Prime Minister, Matteo Renzi, says that Europe’s third largest economy will see growth of “around zero” this year.

Scotland, towards a more just and fair society

open Democracy News Analysis – by Molly Harvey and John Harvey

An independent Scotland could be the start of something even bigger: disaffected voters in England, Wales and Northern Ireland motivated to find a new society

A UK without Scotland

If Scotland votes Yes…..

At the time of writing it seems possible that the Scots will vote to leave the UK in the referendum on September 18th. The consequences of a Yes to independence are unfathomable but would stretch far beyond the British Isles. A Yes would not only shake up British politics but also increase the likelihood of Residual UK (RUK) leaving the EU, boost separatism elsewhere in Europe and diminish the global standing of what was left of Britain

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