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Social media and the Boston bombings: When citizens and journalists cover the same story

from Nieman Journalism Lab by Hong Qu

Editor?s note: Hong Qu is a user experience designer who was part of the startup team that built YouTube. He is currently a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation, working on an application to help journalists and other users better follow stories though Twitter.



Obama in Boston: ?State of Grace? among his best orations

from The Global Language Monitor

 

8 Campaigns Helping Boston Victims and Their Families

from Mashable! by Zoe Fox

When Following Breaking News, Why it Helps to Think Like a Journalist

from MediaShift

A lot is happening in Boston, just like a lot has happened in past months, including a lot of hype on the news, a lot of confusion, and the spread of quite some misinformation.

 

This Week in Review: Verification online and off in Boston?s wake, and an underdog?s Pulitzer win

from Nieman Journalism Lab by Mark Coddington

 

Russian militant group denies Boston link

from FT.com – World, Europe

Investigators are looking into a half-year trip one of the suspects took to the Caucasus in 2012 to determine whether he connected with militants

Facebook Cracks Down on Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Fan Pages

from Mashable! by The Daily Dot

 

Social Media Offers Help After Boston Marathon Explosions

from MediaShift

Two blasts near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon Monday left the city in shock and frenzy. Soon after, disheartening on-the-ground tweets, photos and videos were shared throughout the social web. In the early hours, these updates served to inform the entire world the horror and tragedy transpiring through the streets of Boston. In the later hours, online and social media tools like Google Docs and Twitter connected Boston locals to the out-of-town runners and visitors who could really use their help. The way social media is manifesting in immediate relief for victims is perhaps one uplifting moment in a truly heartbreaking day.

 

Social Media Offers Vital Updates, Support After Boston Marathon Bombings

from MediaShift

Two blasts near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon Monday left the city in shock and frenzy. Soon after, disheartening on-the-ground tweets, photos and videos were shared throughout the social web. In the early hours, these updates served to inform the entire world of the horror and tragedy transpiring through the streets of Boston. In the later hours, online and social media tools such as Google Docs and Twitter connected Boston locals to the out-of-town runners and visitors who could really use their help. The way social media is manifesting in immediate relief for victims is perhaps one uplifting moment in a truly heartbreaking day. WARNING: Some graphic images are in the roundup below.

Social media and the Boston bombings: When citizens and journalists cover the same story

from Nieman Journalism Lab by Hong Qu

Editor?s note: Hong Qu is a user experience designer who was part of the startup team that built YouTube. He is currently a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation, working on an application to help journalists and other users better follow stories though Twitter.

 

The connection between Boston and Europe?s train bombers

from washingtonpost.com – Op-Ed Columns by Anne Applebaum

There is much that we don?t yet know about Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. But we do know that their family is ethnically Chechen, that they come from the Russian republic of Chechnya, where war broke out in 1994. Although that war began as a movement for Chechen sovereignty and independence, it escalated into two extraordinarily bloody, messy, vicious armed conflicts during which hundreds of thousands of people were killed. The Chechen capital, Grozny, was thoroughly destroyed. Photographs taken there after the war?s end look eerily old-fashioned, as though they were from Warsaw or Dresden in 1945.

 

 

 

 

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