Orhan Pamuk on His Museum of Innocence in Istanbul
Newsweek
Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk explains why he built a museum dedicated to the glory and tragedy of one fictional couple’s love. Print; Email; Comments. The museums I visited in my childhood?not just in Istanbul but even in Paris, where I first went in

 

Six Degrees of Separation Shrink to Three Degrees

from Social Media Week by Nicky Yates
The views expressed in this article are solely those of the author, Lisa Chau, and do not necessarily represent those of Dartmouth College or the Tuck School of Business.
At a time when Facebook stock continues to plummet, is there a market for a new social networking site? Judging by the heightened anticipation expressed by members of Swedish Count Erik Wachtmeister?s first invite-only site, A Small World (aSW), the answer is a resounding YES.

 

Digital Literacies and Web Literacies: What’s the Difference?

from DML Central by jbrazil
Doug Belshaw
I?m currently iterating some work around Web Literacies for the Mozilla Foundation (you can see the latest version of my thinking here). Perhaps the biggest consideration when dealing with so-called ?New? Literacies is distinguishing them from one another. As I’ve discussed many times before, without some clear thinking on this issue both theorists and practitioners alike tend to talk past one another using imprecise terminology. What I want to consider in this post is the relationship between Digital literacies and Web literacies. Aren?t they just synonyms?

 

Kurdish Files Access

from Mavi Boncuk by M.A.M

 

Traditional face-to-face higher education will become a privilege of a few

from Oxford Internet Institute – Blogs
Cristobal Cobo on 13 August 2012 at 13:59PM
In the coming weeks I?ll meet a number of researchers who are working in ICT, learning and innovation from the University of Granada. In preparation, I?m compiling some resources and documentation that I hope will be useful for them. Here some early conclusion of resources that hope will be interesting for those who are exploring new

 

Neal Stephenson’s Some Remarks, a remarkable essay collection

from Boing Boing by Cory Doctorow

Neal Stephenson is a talented essayist, a fact that anyone who read his seminal In the Beginning… Was the Command Linewill be aware of. Some of the finest moments in his fiction is really nonfiction, essays that make up part of the story, which some critics take umbrage at. I love it. I happen to love discursive novels. But that said, Stephenson’s essays are even more enjoyable than the discursions in his novels, which is saying something.

The Happy Planet Index : 2012 Report

from Docuticker
Source: New Economics Foundation (UK) From Executive Summary: The Happy Planet Index (HPI) measures what matters. It tells us how well nations are doing in terms of supporting their inhabitants to live good lives now, while ensuring that others can do the same in the future, i.e. sustainable well-being for all

Reading Academic PDFs on the iPad (Tools We Use)

from Savage Minds: Notes and Queries in Anthropology ? A Group Blog by Kerim
Last December I wrote a post, Reading Fast, Reading Slow, which covered the various tools I use in my digital workflow depending on the kind of reading I?m doing. Today I want to update that with an in-depth look at what I had referred to as ?slow? reading, focusing especially on texts which I have available in PDF format. This workflow assumes you have an Apple desktop computer, an iPad and the following software: Sente for OS X, Sente for iOS, Goodreader for iOS, a Dropbox account and an Evernote account. This is not a review of any of these tools, although the strengths and limitations of Sente are discussed in terms of how they help or hinder this specific workflow. I don?t by any means consider this to be an ideal workflow, but after having experimented and researched numerous options based on the tools which are currently available, this is the one that works best for me.

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