Anthropology & Open Access: An Interview with Jason Baird Jackson (Part 1 of 3)

from Savage Minds: Notes and Queries in Anthropology ? A Group Blog by Ryan

During the last few weeks I had the chance to conduct an email based interview with Jason Baird Jackson about Open Access (OA), academic publishing, and anthropology?

Ryan Anderson: Thanks for doing this interview, Jason. My first question is really basic: What IS open access all about, and how is it any different from standard academic publishing?

Anthropology & Open Access: An Interview with Jason Baird Jackson (Savage Minds)

from ethnografix by Ryan Anderson

During the last few weeks I had the chance to conduct an email based interview with Jason Baird Jackson about Open Access (OA), academic publishing, and anthropology (cross-posted on Savage Minds)…

Ryan Anderson: Thanks for doing this interview, Jason. My first question is really basic: What IS open access all about, and how is it any different from standard academic publishing?

Anthropology & Open Access: An Interview with Jason Baird Jackson (Part 2 of 3)

from Savage Minds: Notes and Queries in Anthropology ? A Group Blog by Ryan
See Part 1 of this interview, here.
Ryan Anderson: So what are the major stumbling blocks holding up a transition to Open Access in your view? What?s keeping most people from making this jump? Lastly, what do you think about the system employed by the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) where authors can post working papers? Can a system like that be a stepping stone to OA?

Guardian sends anthropologist on fieldwork among bankers in London

from antropologi.info – anthropology in the news blog by Lorenz
Can you make a complex subject like the world of finance accessible to outsiders? What about sending an anthropologist into the world of bankers in London?s financial district and let him blog his findings?

More on AAA publishing: The matter of costs

from American Anthropological Association by Michael F. Brown

Let?s pick up the expanding thread on AAA publishing by considering costs.  Coming up with a single figure for the AAA?s large publication portfolio is frustratingly difficult. There are complications such as sunk costs, various ways of calculating overhead, the complexities of the W-B contract, and the like. I?m an anthropologist, not an accountant, so I?ll stick to basics:

The need for more spectacle in academic presentations: What anthropologists can learn from wrestlers

from antropologi.info – anthropology in the news blog by Lorenz
Now, only a few days before the largest gathering of anthropologists in the world, it?s time to take up again the banner of the well-prepared, well-written, well-presented conference paper, writes Rex in his post Defending the form at Savage Minds .

Perge excavations turn 65 with Turkish archaeologists

from Hurriyet Dailynews by ANTALYA – Anatolia News Agency
Excavations at Perge, an ancient city in Antalya province, have entered their 65th year. The excavation leader believes the ancient city was an artisan workshop

William & Mary anthropologist begins blogging for NPR
William and Mary News
William & Mary anthropologist Barbara King has begun a guest-blogging stint on 13.7: Cosmos and Culture, a web-based feature of National Public Radio. ?I was asked to blog for an unspecified time as a mutual trial

ethos and the reputation economy

from digital digs by Alex Reid
I’ve gone back and forth on a kind of anecdotal/example level with this question of assessment/badges/whatever. In the comments to some of my recent posts there are stories of how badges can do good things. These are echoed elsewhere in the web. Clearly I’ve offered some counterexamples illustrating how these things can go wrong. I think it’s fair to say that just because something might go wrong that doesn’t mean that it will (as long as it is fair to say the reverse as well). In that light, optimism suggests, let’s give it a try.

New York State Senators want “refined First Amendment,” laws to prevent trolling, flaming and excluding people from online groups

by Cory Doctorow
New York State Senators Jeff Klein, Diane Savino, David Carlucci and David Valesky apparently missed civics class, because they think the First Amendment grants the “privilege” of free speech, not the right, and that this “refined” view of free speech should be implemented in order to stop people from saying stupid things on the Internet.

Love, Duty, and Marriage in a Classic Thai Novel

from Ethnography.com by Tony
In summer 2011, I had the pleasure of co-teaching a Sociology/English class for American students in Thailand.  One of the real pleasures was using novels to illustrate sociological principles.  It was kind of like profession (sociology) meets hobby (reading novels).  I hope that the students liked it?I certainly did, and this blog is about what was my favorite Thai novel of the summer, Behind the Painting.  It proved to be ideal for discussing a wide range of subjects stretching across both sociology and literature, particularly the meaning of duty and love in structuring Thai and American society.

The Dance ? Medicine and the Idea of Movement

from Somatosphere by Sarah Pinto
I have been conducting research on the experiences of women with mental illness in India in an effort to understand how everyday relationships shape medical practice and enliven the subjectivities clinical life makes possible. Like any ethnographer, I am interested in what people say.  Ethnographic methods privilege speech: we seek narrative, memories, and a good interview; we hope to overhear juicy talk. However, in psychiatry wards talk can play ambivalent roles.  It is highly routinized; it is put to different uses by doctors; it is unreliable; it is changeable.

Pavlopetri: 4,000-year old underwater city brought to life

from Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog by Dienekes

Writing an anthropological detective story – Interview with Nancy Scheper-Hughes Part 3/3

from antropologi.info – anthropology in the news blog by Lorenz
By Aleksandra Bartoszko. Oslo University Hospital, Equality and Diversity Unit
See part I of the interview Being radical critical without being leftist and part II The global trade with poor people's kidneys
Nancy Scheper-Hughes is currently working on finishing her book, which will summarize more than ten years fieldwork on organ trafficking. In this interview she tells us about A World Cut in Two: Global Justice and the Traffic in Organs and she shares her reflections on challenges of doing and disseminating multi-sited research.

Earliest sapiens remains in Europe

from Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog by Dienekes
From the BBC:
They may be yellowed and worn but these ancient teeth and jaw fragment have something very revealing to say about how modern humans conquered the globe.

The specimens, unearthed in Italy and the UK, have just been confirmed as the earliest known remains of Homo sapiens in Europe.

An online anthropology compiler (& nominations for Open Lab 2011)

from Neuroanthropology by gregdowney

Anthropologist: “Stop the abuse of migrants at the U.S. – Mexican boder!”

from antropologi.info – anthropology in the news blog by Lorenz
They beat children and adults during apprehensions and in custody, they deny people with life-threatening medical conditions treatment, separate family members and confiscate their belongings.

Sacred Bundle 2.0: Anthropology Online

from From the Annals of Anthroman by John L. Jackson, Jr.
Oxford University Press has launched a new and ambitious on-line project, Oxford Bibliographies Online, which attempts to provide scholars, students, and other interested readers with introductions to important topics and themes from many academic fields/disciplines. Atlantic History, Criminology, Communication, Philosophy and Sociology are among the modules already available. Later this month, Political Science and Psychology go live, with Education soon to follow.

A Creative Spin on Teaching Anthropology

from American Anthropological Association by Joslyn O.
Professor Balmurli Natrajan of William Patterson University has put a creative spin on his anthropology class ? Global Transformations and the Human Condition. The class started out as a small 10 student class when introduced, but due to growing popularity Natrajan added the course to the spring term as well.

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