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Special Series: Online Privacy

from MediaShift

“All the world’s a stage,” and even moreso with the rise of the Internet, online advertising and social networking. While there is no American “right to privacy” in the Constitution, there are limits to what we want companies, publishers and advertisers to do with our personal information. Do we want advertisers to serve ads based on our web surfing habits? Should we be able to opt out from that kind of tracking? How would that work? The U.S. government — including the FTC, Commerce Department and Congress — is considering more regulation, while the industry tries self-regulation…again. While MediaShift gave a nice guide to online privacy a couple years back, the time is right to give an in-depth look at online privacy in the age of the always-on social web.

5Across: Online Privacy and the ‘Do Not Track’ Debate

from MediaShift

The debate around online privacy has largely centered around advertising that is targeted at people depending on where they have been online. While somewhat creepy, those ads are perhaps the least of our worries. What many of us don’t realize is that there are multiple parties tracking our moves online, some harmless and some possibly nefarious.

Why I?m increasingly skeptical toward every ?Facebook study? published on Mashable and elsewhere

from Bloggasm by Simon

Today we received the stunning news from All Facebook that ?83 Percent Of Prostitutes Have Facebook Pages.?

Hunting the Spotted Hiybbprqag Mountweazel: The Google / Bing Thing

from d i a p s a l m a t a by Whitney
Last week, Google claimed Bing has been stealing its search results, sparking a rather public tussle over legitimate uses of clickstream monitoring. While the debate itself has been interesting, I’m more struck by the way in which Google discovered the supposed theft:

Disgraced security firm asked Bank of America to fund anti-Wikileaks/anti-Glen Greenwald campaign

from Boing Boing by Cory Doctorow

Access to Mobile Phones Increases Protests Against Repressive Regimes

from iRevolution by Patrick Meier

I recently shared a draft of my first dissertation chapter which consists of a comprehensive literature review on the impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) on Democracy, Activism and Dictatorship. Thanks very much to everyone who provided feedback, I really appreciate it. I will try to incorporate as much of the feedback as possible in the final version and will also update that chapter in the coming months given the developments in Tunisia and Egypt.

Without Tactical Execution, Social Media Doesn?t Work

from Sysomos Blog by Mark Evans

Over the past couple of years, I have talked with lots of companies excited about the potential of social media. Fuelled by this enthusiasm, they put together detailed strategic plans and set themselves up on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, et al.

The Yes Men’s Bichlbaum Discusses Ethics of WikiLeaks

from MediaShift

In my first post on MediaShift, I laid out how the digital media revolution was compelling organizations to become more transparent in their communication with the public. While vigorous in my promotion of radical transparency, I acknowledged “practical limits,” such as the revelation of competitive secrets or legally sensitive information.

Is the State Dept. better than Google at not being evil?

from Wiki Leaks by Charles Homans

2011-02-02 Julian Assange awarded Sydney Peace Medal

The Sydney Peace Foundation has announced that it will award a rare gold medal to WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange for his work on behalf of peace and justice worldwide. The Peace Medal, distinct from the foundation’s annual Peace Prize, has been awarded to only three other individuals: the Dalai Lama, Nelson Mandela, and Japanese lay Buddhist leader Daisaku Ikeda.

Social Media Alone Do Not Instigate Revolutions

from MediaShift

This post was also written by Sean Noonan for STRATFOR.

Internet services were reportedly restored in Egypt yesterday after being completely shut down for two days. Egyptian authorities unplugged the last Internet service provider (ISP) still operating Jan. 31 amidst ongoing protests across the country. The other four providers in Egypt — Link Egypt, Vodafone/Raya, Telecom Egypt and Etisalat Misr — were shut down as the crisis boiled over on Jan. 27. Commentators immediately assumed this was a response to the organizational capabilities of social media websites that Cairo could not completely block from public access.

New York Times & Guardian Editors Will Support Assange if Prosecuted

from Mashable! by Vadim Lavrusik

Why the Music Industry Must Change Its Strategy to Reach Digital Natives

from Mashable! by Mark Mulligan

Google (and Microsoft) Respond to the ?Bing Sting? Controversy [INTERVIEW]

from Mashable! by Ben Parr

7 Years of Facebook: A Retrospective

from Mashable! by Christina Warren

Wikileaks ACTA cables confirm it was a screwjob for the global poor

from Boing Boing by Cory Doctorow

Quadrature du Net’s repository of #cablegate cables related to ACTA, the secretive copyright treaty reveal that governments all over the world were pissed off that the USA and Japan wouldn’t let them discuss the treaty with their citizens and industry.

Maps, Activism and Technology: Check-In?s with a Purpose

from iRevolution by Patrick Meier

?Having a real-time map, complete with satellite photos, of where everyone is at any one moment is almost as good as having your own helicopter overhead ? maybe better, if you can distract the crew of the helicopter.?

As recently announced on the Ushahidi blog, the group is launching a check-in service a la Foursquare called ?Crowdmap : Check-In?s? or just CI for short. I?m excited by the different applications that a free and open-source check-in-with-a-purpose platform can have for social impact. In this blog post, I?ll share some ideas on how activists might use CI for popular nonviolent movements when the service is launched next month at SxSW 2011. I will also highlight another very cool project called Sukey, which was just launched in the UK.

Will U.S. Government Crack the Whip on Online Privacy?

from MediaShift

This week MediaShift will be running an in-depth special report on Online Privacy, including a timeline of Facebook privacy issues, a look at how political campaigns retain data, and a 5Across video discussion. Stay tuned all week for more stories on privacy issues.

Special Series: Online Privacy

from MediaShift

“All the world’s a stage,” and even moreso with the rise of the Internet, online advertising and social networking. While there is no American “right to privacy” in the Constitution, there are limits to what we want companies, publishers and advertisers to do with our personal information. Do we want advertisers to serve ads based on our web surfing habits? Should we be able to opt out from that kind of tracking? How would that work? The U.S. government — including the FTC, Commerce Department and Congress — is considering more regulation, while the industry tries self-regulation…again. While MediaShift gave a nice guide to online privacy a couple years back, the time is right to give an in-depth look at online privacy in the age of the always-on social web.

What Value Is Crowdsourcing to Corporate Social Responsibility? [STATS]

from Mashable! by Zachary Sniderman

Gartner: Symbian Is Still the Number One Smartphone Platform [REPORT]

from Mashable! by Stan Schroeder

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