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Egypt: Remembering Egypt’s Martyrs

from Global Voices Online by Amira Al Hussaini

Written by Amira Al Hussaini

This post is part of our special coverage of Egypt Protests 2011.

Tribute is pouring from all around the world for those who have lost their lives in protests held across Egypt to call for an end of the Mubarak regime.

Today is the Sunday of Martyrs, in what is the beginning of the Week of Steadfastness, and marks the 13th day of the Egyptian people’s uprising.

A call has gone out for yet another million people’s march at Tahrir Square, in down town Cairo, to remember those killed in the protests. The day is expected to feature a Coptic mass, and the families of those killed in the protests have been asked to attend, carrying placards with the names of their dear ones on them. Tahrir Square has been the epicentre of protests in recent days, and a permanent fixture on television screens beaming the developments on the ground live into our living rooms.

Facebook page: Freedom Martyrs

Photo Of Egyptian Saying ?I Love Facebook? Goes Viral

from All Facebook by Jackie Cohen

A photo of an Egyptian protester holding a sign saying ?I love Facebook? has become viral on Twitter via the shortened address http://yfrog.com/h3g76hj and now it?s beginning to show up on Facebook.

Mubarak?s thugs make a mockery of media neutrality , Daniel-Joseph MacArthur-Seal

from open Democracy News Analysis – by Daniel-Joseph MacArthur-Seal
Media reporting of today’s events in Cairo plays into Mubarak’s hands and betrays the journalists risking their lives to expose the violence perpetrated by the regime.

Interview with Andy Carvin on curating Twitter to watch Tunisia, Egypt

from …My heart’s in Accra by Ethan

Andy Carvin is a pioneer in online organizing, digital journalism and social media. He?s currently ?senior strategist? at NPR, helping the radio network develop their digital strategies. For the past month, he?s been one of the most interesting people to follow on Twitter, as he?s been aggregating and curating many streams of information about the protests in Tunisia and Egypt. I caught up with him today, chatting via Skype as he continued to tweet updates on the situation in Egypt. Here?s a lightly edited transcript of our conversation, which took place between 3-4pm today (February 4, 2011.)

Media/Anthropology: Selected bookmarks about Egypt and Tunisia

from ethnografix by Ryan Anderson

John Postill over at media/anthropology has a great new post that lists some key articles, commentaries, and discussions that trace the development of the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia over the last month or so. Many of them focus on the role that media has played in all of these events, which is an important issue to discuss (some people assume that technology is the driving force behind these social movements, but there is good reason to rethink that position a bit). Anyway, here is one of my favorite quotes listed:

Egypt: Citizen Media Exposes Violence During Media Black Out (Graphic)

from Global Voices Online by Hisham

Egypt: Is Amr Moussa an Acceptable Alternative to Mubarak?

from Global Voices Online by Amira Al Hussaini

Why Egyptians Should Insist that Citizen Mubarak Stay

from tabsir.net by tabsir

Power, realpolitik, and freedom: Egypt and US Ideals about Freedom

from ethnografix by Ryan Anderson

What absolutely blows me away is how quickly some folks drop their supposed ideals about freedom and democracy when the people under consideration are far away (like in Egypt, for example). It’s shocking, actually, to hear some folks out there calling for the support of Mubarak as a close ally (check the comments section).

Zizek on events in Egypt

from ethnografix by Ryan Anderson

Slavoj Zizek on revolution, the west, Egypt, and fear:

Egypt: Mubarak has changed his Facebook status to ?it’s complicated?

from Global Voices Online by Carmel L. Vaisman

Written by Carmel L. Vaisman

This post is part of our special coverage of Egypt Protests 2011.

To answer Malcolm Gladwell’s doubtful question if Egypt needs Twitter, it seems ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) played a big role in the #jan25 revolution in Egypt. Since the initial demonstrations were organized by young activists through Facebook, Egyptians refer to this young generation as ?the Facebook youth?. In this picture tweeted yesterday, this man thanks Egypt’s Facebook youth for starting this uprising:


Tweeps report that protesters in Tahrir are well aware of the power of Facebook and Twitter and carry signs with the names of those sites.

Egypt: Did Mubarak Resign as Head of the Ruling NDP?

from Global Voices Online by Amira Al Hussaini

Challenging America?s Pharaoh: A Revolutionary Movement and the Future of Egyptian (In)dependence

from OPEN ANTHROPOLOGY by Maximilian Forte

Egypt Protesters Will Spark Global Mass Movements: Internet and Globalization?s Positives

from OPEN ANTHROPOLOGY by John Stanton

Democracy or Extremism? Political Ideals and Egypt

from ethnografix by Ryan Anderson

The US has a pretty confusing–if not outright contradictory–history of foreign policy. On the surface, we supposedly are the champions of democracy, human rights, and freedom. Right? Those are the ideals that the nation was founded upon, and they continue to play a primary role in the political rhetoric and overall idealism of its people.

Israel: Why this Israeli is so invested in Egypt?

from Global Voices Online by Carmel L. Vaisman

The American Anthropological Association and Egypt: It?s Mostly About the Artifacts?

from OPEN ANTHROPOLOGY by Maximilian Forte

Egypt: The Day of (Almost) Departure

from Global Voices Online by Carmel L. Vaisman

Written by Carmel L. Vaisman

This post is part of our special coverage of Egypt Protests 2011.

After two days of clashes, in which pro-democracy demonstrators were attacked by pro-Mubarak crowds, Friday – labelled as the ?Day of Departure? saw increasing numbers of people pouring into Tahrir Square, down town, Cairo, where the images of peaceful celebrations returned.

Egypt: Wael Abbas, Arrested by Army, then Released

from Global Voices Online by Amira Al Hussaini

Written by Amira Al Hussaini

This post is part of our special coverage of Egypt Protests 2011.

Prominent Egyptian blogger Wael Abbas, who has been instrumental in uncovering police torture and brutality, was held for about an hour today – raising the concern of netizens around the world. Among those held yesterday were blogger Sandmonkey, who was on his way to deliver medical aid to Tahrir Square.

Egypt: The View from Jordan

from Global Voices Online by Nadine Toukan

NYT reporters account of being detained by Egypt’s secret police

from Boing Boing by Xeni Jardin

Souad Mekhennet and Nicholas Kulish of the New York Times write about their detention this week by Egypt’s secret police, the Mukhabarat?they saw dozens of other journalists held, and witnessed the far more harsh abuse of Egyptian protesters detained in the same facilities:

Glenn Beck gold company on how to profit from Egypt unrest

from Boing Boing by Rob Beschizza

White House emboldened by Egypt bloodshed

by Mark Mardell (the Reporters)

Amid the violence on the streets of Cairo one pro-Mubarak demonstrator holds aloft a hand made sign reading “Shut up Obama”.

But the disorder on the streets has only sharpened the Obama’s administration appetite for a confrontation. ABC says Obama is “very concerned” that President Hosni Mubarak is delaying. The Wall Street Journal says the White House has a new plan for a speedy transfer of power. The New York Times says the CIA is war-gaming how that will play in the region.

Egypt: My 73-year-old Father at Tahrir

from Global Voices Online by Amira Al Hussaini

Written by Amira Al Hussaini

This post is part of our special coverage of Egypt Protests 2011.

Egyptian Nadia El Awady last night tweeted that she needed a wheelchair to take her 73-year-old father to Tahrir today, where a Coptic mass is taking place as part of the Sunday of Martyrs.

Egypt: Welcoming A New Country

from Global Voices Online by Ayesha Saldanha

Written by Ayesha Saldanha

This post is part of our special coverage of Egypt Protests 2011.

Egyptians are dreaming of a better future, and for some the dream is already coming true. In this post we hear from Egyptian bloggers who feel they are seeing a new country being born, the country they have been waiting for.

Egypt: ?I am writing for the sake of history?

from Global Voices Online by Ayesha Saldanha

Written by Ayesha Saldanha

This post is part of our special coverage of Egypt Protests 2011.

The protests in Egypt continue, and have the attention of people not only in Egypt, but across the region and around the world. In this post we hear from a blogger who wants to remind anyone who might sympathise with President Mubarak just how things have reached this point.

Jordan: Islamists Refuse Offer to Join Government

from Global Voices Online by Betsy Fisher

Written by Betsy Fisher

King Abdullah II followed Prime Minister Samir Rifai’s resignation with the appointment of former PM Maarouf Bakhit, a Jordanian loyalist with military roots. While Islamists had called for Rifai’s resignation or dismissal, they again reacted negatively to the King’s choice, saying that Bakhit is incapable of undertaking political reform. The King met with opposition Islamist leaders, whose political demands include reforming Jordan’s electoral law and ending Jordan’s peace treaty with Israel. Jordan’s 2010 electoral law implemented a system of virtual subdistricts which was confusing for voters, and kept district boundaries gerrymandered to heavily favor Bedouin areas over urban areas with large Palestinian-Jordanian populations.

Kuwait: Praying for a Free Egypt

from Global Voices Online by Abdullatif AlOmar

Russia: Bloggers React, Reflect On Egypt Protests

from Global Voices Online by Ashley Cleek

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