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US Election 2010: Obama lost the terms of debate and a large segment of white women, Ruth Rosen

from open Democracy News Analysis – by Ruth Rosen

In the wake of the election, progressive movements and their members are debating what went wrong.  Some say the media amplified the bizarre statements of the Tea Party.  Still others argue that Obama didn?t offer sufficient leadership or remind us what he had actually achieved during his first 18 months in office. Many blame no one, knowing that midterm elections bring a backlash, regardless of who is power.

BERİL DEDEOĞLU – The US elections

The outcome of the mid-term polls in the United States was as predicted: The Democrats have failed and President Barack Obama has taken the responsibility upon himself. He was naturally not solely the reason for this setback — all Democrats have a share of the responsibility.

KLAUS JURGENS – Republicans take Congress, Democrats hold Senate: Ankara to benefit?

This week?s mid-term elections in the United States featured less prominently on international commentator?s radars than expected. When Wall Street opened on the morning after, it was already back to business-as-usual because most observers had quite accurately forecast Republicans would re-take Congress.

ERGUN BABAHAN – Obama?s elections and Turkey

Elections are of interest first and foremost to the countries in which they occur, and to the citizens of said countries. However, it is also inevitable that elections also affect the general region of the countries in which they occur.

Just how bad was the Democratic defeat?

from Social Europe Journal by Gabor Gyori

If you want to be cynical, then the US Congressional elections has made Congressional Democrats considerably more left-wing. The vast majority of House Democrats who were defeated were from the party?s moderate wing,  so on average the surviving Democratic caucus is much more likely to be amenable to progressive policy proposals than their outgoing peers.  Not that they can do much about it.

Should Obama betray self-doubt?

from Mark Mardell | The Reporters

We’ve just witnessed what must be one of the most extraordinary presidential appearances ever. At times, it felt more like therapy than a news conference.

Obama is sad but not sorry about the election results

from washingtonpost.com – Op-Ed Columnss
Obama has many talents; contrition, however, is not high among them.


Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1911. “Savoy Theatre, Schlitz & Young’s hotels.” 8×10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

Elections 2010: The Morning After the Morning After

from WhirledView by Patricia H. Kushlis

By Patricia H. Kushlis

Jon Stewart?s ?Rally for Sanity? was the single bright spot in a dismal mid-term election season ? one otherwise overflowing with invective, manufactured hates, lies, racial and religious slurs and just about anything else to tear down one opponent or another in a kind of dog-eat-dog scenario that could not have done this country?s democracy proud in the eyes of the world. America watchers abroad are now trying to understand the election’s significance and the likely impact on US foreign policy.

Washington, D.C., 1923. “Catholic University basketball team.” An interesting array of affects here. National Photo Company glass negative. View full size.

Change has come…again: Mapping the US midterm elections

from Worldmapper
Worldmapper: We have created a a map of the election results to the House of Representatives in the latest US election. The new map is reprojected according to the populationdistribution, thus giving a clearer picture of the real vote share: http://bit.ly/midtermmap

Obama still winning in Twitter power – By Andrew Swift

from FP Passport by Andrew Swift

President Barack Obama may be hurting from midterm electoral defeats, but he should take solace that he is, in international relations Twitter circles, by far the most popular kid on the block. In fact, for International Relations Twitter Theorists, Obama’s global influence is in fact understated.

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