Towards Referendum (1): a roundup

Posted by on July 28th, 2010
Stored in Documents, Turkish politics

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Unfortunately, I could not find an English translation of proposed changes. I am working on it. You can find a documents where all changes in Turkish are listed. Besides, AKP set up a website again only in Turkish about the changes here. I will declare my official position on referendum soon…

The list of constitutional changes (in Turkish)

Yes or no!

by HASAN CEMAL – MİLLİYET
Yes or no on the Sept. 12 referendum? Are you confused? Maybe. You may not like the Justice and Development Party (AK Party); the conservative understanding it represents or the lifestyle it adopts may not appeal to you.

Crown package with Article 35

by MUSTAFA ÜNAL – ZAMAN
Republican People?s Party (CHP) leader Kemal Kılıçdaroğlu sidetracked the Sept. 12 debates by bringing up Article 35 (of the Turkish Armed Forces [TSK] Internal Service Law).

Settling accounts with Sept. 12

by HASAN CEMAL – MİLLİYET
The Sept. 12, 1980 coup is the source of all evil of the last 30 years. It is the reason behind many big problems we are experiencing in economics and politics.

İHSAN YILMAZ – Generals? ?support? for the referendum

Our generals do not, of course, support democratization in Turkey. Even though they like to speak about every single issue under the sun, they never mention that Turkey needs democratization or transparency, and thus, the EU process.

The referendum?s tactical wars by MÜMTAZ?ERTÜRKÖNE

Since Rousseau, we have described constitutions as ?social contracts.? What it means for a constitution to be a social contract is that constitutional rules belong not to the political arena, but to society.

ŞULE KULU – Analyzing the ?no? front

As the historic Sept. 12 referendum draws near, both the supporters and the opponents of the constitutional amendment package have begun raising their voices. Political parties have already announced the color of their votes, with the opposition kicking off its ?no? campaign and the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) appealing for a ?yes? vote.

The referendum countdown

from Hurriyet Dailynews by HDN
Since polling firm KONDA asked me to write on the upcoming referendum for their August Barometer report, I have been immersed in their last two surveys.

Military coup memories fuel Turkish PM’s referendum campaign

from Hurriyet Dailynews
Conjuring the last words of young people executed after the 1980 coup, PM Erdoğan called Tuesday in an emotional speech for a ‘yes’ vote on constitutional reforms.

Turkish opposition chief to discuss referendum with European politicians

from Hurriyet Dailynews
The leader of Turkey’s main opposition has said he will respond to European criticisms over his party’s plans to push a

EMRE USLU – Basics of the Turkish political system: the military

In a normal democratic country, viewing the military institution as part of the political system is unthinkable. Yet in Turkey, without understanding the key role that the military plays in the political system, it is not possible to understand how this country is run. Through various mechanisms, the Turkish military assumes a critical role in the Turkish political system.

EMRE USLU – Basics of the Turkish political system: religion

from Today’s Zaman, your gateway to Turkish daily news :: Columnists by EMRE USLU
In the Turkish political system, the issue of religion has always been considered a problem. The common argument on this issue has been developed as follows: The modern Turkish state accepted secularism as one of the main pillars of its foundation; therefore, it upset religious circles; therefore, the confrontation continues.

The ?civilian tutelage? fiction

by ORAL ÇALIŞLAR – RADİKAL
I said to a friend that ?the threat of a military coup is losing its significance day by day.? He immediately responded, ?Now the threat of civilian tutelage is approaching.?

The defeatism of Turkey?s opposition

by istanbulnotes

For the sake of argument, let?s assume that the opposition is correct and the AKP?s constitutional amendments have been designed to enable the party to pack the higher judiciary with its people. (Let?s leave aside the question of whether a degree of court-packing isn?t already built into Turkey?s institutional framework.) The thing that puzzles me is why the opposition seems to equate an increased role for parliament in appointments to the higher judiciary with an increased role for the AKP in particular. Have they given up on getting back into power themselves? Are they still so dazed and confused by the AKP?s electoral successes over the past decade that they believe there is now no way to overturn its parliamentary majority?

HAKPAR Leader Bozyel: Boycotting referendum is a timid no campaign

Calling the constitutional amendment a critical step in Turkey?s democratization process, Rights and Freedoms Party (HAK-PAR) leader Bayram Bozyel assessed the Peace and Democracy Party?s (BDP) call to boycott the referendum as a lack of having its own policy.

Say ?no? and oppose both to be called ?pro-coup?

by YASİN AKTAY – YENİ ŞAFAK
Those opposing the constitutional changes say ?no? to the abolishment of Article 15 of the Constitution, which bans the trial of coup perpetrators, but don?t want to be called coup supporters.

FATMA DİŞLİ ZIBAK – Being anti-AK Party, opposition to reforms

A referendum to be held on Sept. 12 on a government-sponsored constitutional reform package continues to be the main topic of debate in Turkey as political parties hit the campaign trail to convince the public to vote either ?yes? or ?no? on the package, which is said will form the cornerstone of Turkish democracy if approved because the reforms will deal a heavy blow to Turkey?s current coup-era Constitution.

Humor circles are supposed to be more critical but they work in favor of status quo and work for NO in the referendum:

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