Although AKP is not the only culprit..

Wikipedia site on (Internet) Censorship in Turkey

Minister’s approach to the ban: Will Google govern this country?
Honestly, Google would be more efficient…
Binali Yıldırım, the Minister of Transport of Turkey, who is also responsible for Communication Affairs, declared that despite several meetings Google refused to cooperate. Mr. Yıldırım said they banned YouTube because of videos insulting Atatürk and he also stated that Google doesn’t pay taxes and it has to pay for its revenues gained in Turkey..
… Friendfeed discussion in his statements here. Mr. Yıldırım’s official site has a poll about his performance as a minister. Most voted option is: Terrible:) here. [besides the irony, he was talking to online news site editors (!)]

Comodo Secure DNS numbers work for the moment:
156.154.70.22
156.154.71.22

Site Kapatma Haberlerine  Dns?siyle Gelen Yorumcu | Bilgi  Haramileri ( #TurkeyCensorGoogle )
But of course DNS is only a temporary solution…

Another solution to have a VPNaccount. Here is a guide in Turkish…

Ekşi Sözlük discussion on web censorship here.

A food blog began to protest last wave of censorship:

Yasaklar kalkana kadar size buradan ekmek yok


Another protesting site here.

A roundup of expert reactions here.

For a protest banner:

use the banner code:

<script type=”text/javascript” charset=”utf-8″

src=”http://www.bilgiharamileri.com/wp-content/uploads/sansur.js“></

script>

or this one:

<script type=”text/javascript” charset=”utf-8″
src=”http://s.xcbg.net/themes/cbg/sansur.js?v1.0“></script>

Facebook protest pages/groups
Here, here and here.

Turkey at the Edge

February 7, 2008 @ 10:32 am · Access Denied, Born Digital, Digital Natives, Human Rights, Internet Filtering, Internet Law, OpenNet Initiative, international, internet & politics

The people of Turkey are facing a stark choice: will they continue to have a mostly free and open Internet, or will they join the two dozen states around the world that filter the content that their citizens see?

Over the past two days, I?ve been here in Turkey to talk about our new book (written by the whole OpenNet Initiative team), called Access Denied. The book describes the growth of Internet filtering around the world, from only about 2 states in 2002 to more than 2 dozen in 2007. I?ve been welcomed by many serious, smart people in Ankara and Istanbul, Turkey, who are grappling with this issue, and to whom I?ve handed over a copy of the new book ? the first copies I?ve had my hands on.

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