Darwin ban is a shame!

Posted by on March 12th, 2009
Stored in Academia news, Documents

Share this post with Digg

Check out the related material below and more… 

Should This Man Be Banned From University Campuses?

By Jenny White on science in Turkey

turkey-darwin.jpg This man has been banned.  And not only because he wears a beard (see post below).  The Turkish government agency responsible for funding science has provoked outrage by removing a 16-page cover story about the life and work of Charles Darwin from the March issue of the widely read popular-science magazine Bilim ve Teknik (Science and Technology) just before it went to press.

200 years after Darwin, 83 years after Scopes

By Turkish Digest

"200 years after Darwin, 83 years after Scopes
ANKARA – A last-minute decision to pull Charles Darwin, the father of evolution, off the cover of a top Turkish scientific journal and the chief editor off the job has fueled criticism that Turkey’s national research council is too politicized."

Darwin article causes flap in Muslim Turkey

By SUZAN FRASER – 2 hours ago

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish university students and teachers on Wednesday protested the removal of an article about Charles Darwin from a state-run science magazine amid concerns that secular views are under threat in the Muslim country."

Reframing human rights in the global era, Fernando Henrique Cardoso

Dear friends,

I am grateful for the invitation to speak about the challenges facing human rights in the global era at the annual Sérgio Vieira de Mello lecture.

Sergio’s entire life was dedicated to the ideals of human rights and humanitarian work. For him freedom and human dignity were the foundation of peace and justice. Sergio was courageous and compassionate. Bold but also pragmatic. Often at the frontlines but always taking the side of the weak, the vulnerable, the powerless. Uncompromising in his principles but with a gift for listening to and learning from those he worked with. He had the capacity to combine a maximum flexibility in dealing with the complexities of real life situations with a strong commitment to basic values. This allowed him to stand unequivocally on the side of the victims while talking to all the parties involved. Perhaps this is as close as one can get to being a practitioner of what I would call the art of politics: this combination of vision and pragmatism, flexibility in the means and consistency on the goals……

Education: Bologna process, sales time in French universities

By rhiannon_nicolson

France is infuriated. The resentment felt towards the Bologna process, aggravated by the repercussions of the economic crisis, has driven students to go on a general strike as a demonstration of their ‘anti-privatisation’ feelings. They fear that their future is going ‘at reduced prices’. We test the water in Clermont Ferrand

Good Teaching: The Top Ten Requirements

By Reflection Cafe

.
Richard Leblanc, York University (Ontario, Canada)

This article appeared in The Teaching Professor after Professor Leblanc won a Seymous Schulich Award for Teaching Excellence including a $10,000 cash award.

One. Good teaching is as much about passion as it is about reason. It’s about not only motivating students to learn, but teaching them how to learn, and doing so in a manner that is relevant, meaningful, and memorable. It’s about caring for your craft, having a passion for it, and conveying that passion to everyone, most importantly to your students.

Global Education Digest 2008

UNESCO Institute for Statistics This 297-page digest compares education statistics for more than 200 countries and territories

 

The Liberal Arts, Abroad

One cannot resist Wikipedia’s peculiar charms on this one. Let us refer to its entry on the “liberal arts.”

“Although the genesis for what is known today as the liberal arts college began in Europe … the term is commonly associated with liberal arts colleges in the United States. Liberal arts colleges are found in countries all over the world as well. [citation needed]”

“Citation needed.” Until recently there wouldn’t have been much to cite for liberal arts colleges outside the United States. In most of the world, higher education can be found in large public universities and in technical training programs. Over the last 10 to 15 years, however, plenty of international examples of liberal learning have emerged: Ashesi University, in Ghana, for instance, or the Smolny College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, in Russia. Soon the list will include New York University’s planned liberal arts college in Abu Dhabi, and the Asian University for Women, which is being established in Bangladesh. There is also Quest University Canada, in Squamish, British Columbia, which states on its Web site, “Private liberal arts and sciences education is a comparatively new concept in the Canadian post-secondary field. Large, research-based, public universities are the norm.”

If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part Three): The Gift Economy and Commodity Culture

By Henry Jenkins

em>This is part three of an eight part series. The report was written by Henry Jenkins, Xiaochang Li, Ana Domb Krauskopf With Joshua Green. Our research was funded by the members of the Convergence Culture Consortium, including GSDM Advertising, MTV Networks, and Turner Broadcasting.

The Gift Economy and Commodity Culture

Spreadability and the Moral Economy

If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part Two): Sticky and Spreadable — Two Paradigms

By Henry Jenkins

This is part two of an eight part series. The report was written by Henry Jenkins, Xiaochang Li, Ana Domb Krauskopf With Joshua Green. Our research was funded by the members of the Convergence Culture Consortium, including GSDM Advertising, MTV Networks, and Turner Broadcasting.

Sticky and Spreadable – Two Paradigms
From Viral to Spreadability

If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part One): Media Viruses and Memes

By Henry Jenkins

Over the next eight posts, I am going to be serializing a white paper which was developed last year by the Convergence Culture Consortium on the topic of Spreadable media. This report was drafted by Henry Jenkins, Xiaochang Li, and Ana Domb Krauskopf With Joshua Green. Our research was funded by the members of the Convergence Culture Consortium, including GSDM Advertising, MTV Networks, and Turner Broadcasting.

Non-State Actors vs. the Westphalian Model

Niketa Kumar: Global governance will introduce a range of actors beyond the Westphalian state and will be based on interconnectedness. In the governing globally model the traditional nation-state will remain in control and formulate policy responding to global interactions.

Last.fm and the Diabolical Power of Data Mining | Electronic Frontier Foundation

By admin on surveillance

Last.fm and the Diabolical Power of Data Mining | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Technical Analysis by Peter Eckersley

Recently, there was a minor scandal when TechCrunch accused Last.fm of turning over information — the identities of people listening to copies of a leaked U2 album — to the RIAA. Last.fm issued a scathing denial of these allegations, and it’s good to hear that the site hasn’t turned into a worldwide music surveillance system. Not on purpose, that is.

%d bloggers like this: