Abdi İpekçi, 30 years after.

Posted by on February 3rd, 2009
Stored in Journalism

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A few days ago, it was the 30th anniversary of Abdi İpekçi assassination. In one of the darkest days of Turkey, he was murdered. Milliyet’s then chief editor has been one of the best journalists in the history of Turkish journalism…May his soul rest in peace…

From Wikipedia entry:
On 1 February 1979, two members of the ultra-nationalist Grey Wolves, Oral Çelik and Mehmet Ali Ağca (who later shot pope John Paul II), murdered Abdi İpekçi in his car on the way back home from his office in front of his apartment building in Istanbul. Ağca was caught due to an informant and was sentenced to life in prison. After serving six months in a military prison in Istanbul, Ağca escaped with the help of the Grey Wolves and fled to Bulgaria, which was then a base of operation for the Turkish mafia.
 

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