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I am better at disseminating than producing actual anthro posts… Hmmm i will have to check back if i had produced anything relevant… 

Best of Anthropology Blogging 2008: Call for Submissions

We’ve decided to host something that has not been done before – the first yearly edition of The Best of Anthropology Blogging. An increasing number of anthropologists are blogging about their work and their ideas, sharing how anthropology in all its forms is relevant to the wider world.


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Associated Press

Happy Birthday, Margaret Mead, Cultural Anthropologist

December 16, 2008
by Jen O’Neill
Dr. Margaret Mead became one of the world’s most renowned American anthropologists through her extensive cross-cultural work on issues including gender roles, environmental justice, education, race relations, child rearing and nutrition. Known as the “observer’s observer,” she successfully bridged the gap between social anthropology and ethnology as we know them today.

David Price: The Leaky Ship of the Human Terrain System

By Maximilian Forte on Roberto Gonzalez

CounterPunch

http://www.counterpunch.org/price12122008.html

[with minor edits for this blog and added empases]
[Thanks to David Price for sending me this and other articles.]

December 12 / 14, 2008

First Read of a Leaked Handbook

The Leaky Ship of Human Terrain Systems

By DAVID PRICE

Human Terrain Systems, one of the U.S. military’s key counterinsurgency efforts to stabilize the occupation of Iraq, appears to suddenly be under serious attack by groups that once offered it support. This latest round of attacks comes not from progressive anthropologists like me or my fellow members of the Network of Concerned Anthropologists; these attacks come from groups with far more centralized power and access to documents and media than any of us academic critics. I don’t know who is behind these attacks but they may be coming from within the belly of the Pentagon or within Human Terrain itself.

Viagra soup: a photo essay

By L.L. Wynn on viagra

In an earlier post, I wondered: Why are there a dozen local brands of sildenafil (the generic name for what’s in Viagra) available in Egyptian pharmacies, and only one brand of emergency contraceptive pill (ECP)? I’m not sure that I have a wholly convincing answer to this question, but I’ll lay out some parts of the puzzle. Jump in with a comment if you have other ideas.

Anthropologie sans frontières: Interview with Dr Alice Corbet

By Paul Mason

Six years ago, Alice Corbet was told by a prominent professor in the Department of Anthropology at the Sorbonne that SHE was too blonde to do ethnographic fieldwork in a refugee camp:

“Mademoiselle Corbet, vous êtes trop blonde pour aller dans un camp de refugiés.”

That same professor saw Alice complete her PhD in September 2008. The now Dr Alice Corbet, who is 26 years old and measures only 159cm in height, certainly showed that professor a thing or two about what a female anthropologist can achieve. But then again, who can pay credence to the words of a man who mistakes a redhead for a blonde!

Media Anthropology and Pedagogy

By ckelty on experiments

Anand Pandian, assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins, shared the site for his Fall Semester undergrad course on The Anthropology of Media. The syllabus is comprehensive and tight. Students were asked to do a semester project on some aspect of the media, and the range of projects runs the gamut from the predictable (facebook) to the intriguing (Industrial Mix Tape: Baltimore’s Diverse Music Scene) to the kitchy (The Indian Chuck Norris).

Donald Tuzin and the Breath of a Ghost

By dlende on Psychological anthropology

Donald Tuzin

Donald Tuzin

In the Scientific American piece Ghost Stories: Visits from the Deceased, Vaughan Bell describes how the dead stay with us. An embodied sense of them, present yet gone, comes strongly through our memories and our perceptions: “for many people [loved ones] linger in our senses—as sights, sounds, smells, touches or presences.”

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